Stories about wedding

Beware: You may be heading into (murderous) marriage

Marriage comes with its own set of doubts and insecurities. You might have heard it on the news, you might have seen it happen with someone you know – there are many stories about failed marriages all around us. Stories about how families have been fooled in the name of this sacred bond and have lost their life’s worth of savings. The increasing statistics about marriages being broken due to infidelity, fraud by the in-laws, husbands being abusive or having prior criminal record, paint a horrible picture of marriages in our country. The divorce rate has reached an alarming level and this ...

Read Full Post

“Stop encouraging the idea of education within these children”

I recently got into an argument over class, status and ranks – the superficial boundaries that divide our society. And the greatest regret coming from it was the fact that even the most educated minds are still so deeply woven into these concepts that it provokes the irrationale amidst me. I grew up with four kids who did not belong to my class; they were children of my ‘maid’ who I lovingly call my second mom. When I was growing up, the word ‘maid’ and ‘nokar’ was prohibited in my household. She was known as ‘Baji’, who helped us around ...

Read Full Post

Why people should NOT get married in Pakistan

Before you wrinkle your eyebrows in a ‘holier-than-thou’ frown and judge my very existence, let me assure you that this blog is not a preaching of what you should or should not do. This blog is based on mere observations of human relationships and a concept that defines our lives in so many ways – shaadi (marriage). I was familiar with this word at a very young age. But it was at the age of six when my brother (eight-years-old then) told me something that freaked me out. In sheer exasperation, that only an older brother can have, he said, “I can’t ...

Read Full Post

Sharmila Farooqi’s Disney wedding and Pakistan’s plight

The coverage of Sharmila Farooqi’s nuptials on national media and the hype associated with it had all the hallmarks relevant for a royal fairy tale wedding. The glorification of the ceremony, pictures of opulence and extravagance, and a happy couple starting a new phase – the event represented everything good in life. Unfortunately, these were pictures of beautiful dresses and lavish feasts set in the backdrop of an impoverished country. Photo: Aysha Saleem This is not the first political wedding on which the national media went gaga. A couple of months ago, we had the Imran and Reham Khan wedding madness, that ...

Read Full Post

Need to recover from the food coma after wedding season? These five gyms can help you do that!

Ringing in the New Year with a resolution to become healthy? Try not to be like the 85% of people who do no more than make a couple of gym visits every January. Trying to get fit is both smart and fashionable – ‘skinny’ just doesn’t cut it anymore. Crash diets are a bad idea because they stifle your metabolism and eventually you end up actually gaining weight. It’s important to make changes in your lifestyle to embrace a healthier, happier you. Apart from just eating healthy, regular exercise and training are required as well. We’ve noticed the ‘fit’ trend picking up in Karachi ...

Read Full Post

And in other news, John Kerry eats doughnuts…

From discussing Reham Khan’s wedding dress and their possible honeymoon destination, to talking about every little detail one can possibly discuss about a wedding, our media has moved on to more mature current affairs. US Sectary of State John Kerry ate a doughnut. He did not just eat a doughnut, he ate a doughnut in Islamabad. There is a difference in the above two statements because the latter is crucial to Pak-US relations and strategic dialogue. Yes, eating doughnuts is central to developing mutually-beneficial foreign policies. A little slice of home here in #Islamabad: @DunkinDonuts to start the day. pic.twitter.com/IOo0wlemTD — John Kerry (@JohnKerry) ...

Read Full Post

Majnu loves Layla, but Ammi doesn’t

Layla and Majnu “Absence is to love what wind is to fire; it extinguishes the small, it inflames the great.” – Bussy-Rabutin He tried really hard to convince his parents, as did She, but sometimes love just isn’t enough. He was Shia, She was Sunni, and the parents on one side were unreasonable. The wedding between them never happened. I saw them suffer silently and loudly, but sadly nothing came of it. They eventually got married to other people, He to a Shia girl 13 years younger than him and She to a rather pleasant professor, and they lived a reasonable albeit unhappy life. ...

Read Full Post

The bench

My crutches sank deep into the muddy grass, the result of a downpour last night. Without tumbling face first into the mud, I yanked them out— it must have rained until morning because the puddles in the garden could still be seen as the day’s sun was about to set. I managed to make my way to the rocky path. The ashen coloured trail of pebbles led me to a bench overlooking a mesmerising pond. I trotted along the trail down to the bench and sat there with a great sigh. I pulled the magazine out from under my arm and set ...

Read Full Post

The ‘Bara Bhai syndrome’ – taking one family at a time

Recently, an international journal of psychiatry published a report about a new disease – the ‘Bara Bhai Syndrome’. It was discovered during research workshops held in Pakistan and India. The hallmark of this disease has been described as an extreme preoccupation with the duty of providing care to the family, heightened sense of sacrifice and responsibility, feeling of guilt and premature ageing. While the disease has been found to be more rampant in South-East Asia, thousands of immigrants in developed countries have also tested positive for it. The disease typically affects the first-born male child. However, comparable symptoms can also be exhibited by the only ...

Read Full Post

50 shades of a red lehnga

It came as no surprise. It had to happen. Years of pent up anticipation and apprehension had gradually built up momentum and all of it led to this – a nerve wracking walk, downstairs. With adrenaline rush turning my ears into an alien shade of crimson and my heart skipping a beat, rolling in my stomach and jumping to touch my parched palate, I carried my wobbling feet into our drawing room. Crap, that darned rebellious carpet always defying to be straightened out; I tripped but quickly steadied myself before I could fall flat on my face. My mother led a slow ...

Read Full Post