Stories about training

Asad Mushtaq is a hero! Winning a Sword of Honour isn’t easy

The Royal Military Academy of Sandhurst, founded back in the 18th century is part of the British Army which works as an officer training academy. It takes around 10% of its cadets from overseas and is one of the oldest military academies in the world that has seen iconic figures such as Sir Winston Curchill and our very own, Field Marshall Ayub Khan. Pakistan’s Corporal Asad Mushtaq, on August 9, 2013, not only graduated from this institution, but also bagged the highest award present there – the Sword of Honour. As an overseas cadet, attendance at Sandhurst military academy is only possible ...

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Factory fires: What you can do to prevent a similar tragedy

Last week at work, during my lunch hour I was casually browsing the internet while eating my sandwich when I first read about the horrific fire incident in the unfortunate factory located in SITE Karachi. A few lines in, the gruesome graphic details and the staggering casualty count made me lose my appetite. Like most people, I couldn’t help but wonder about the horror experienced by the victims during the last few moments of their lives and their helplessness in the wake of imminent death. After getting over the nauseating feeling, I read a few blogs and comment boards on which the ...

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A Bangladeshi perspective on Karachi

I had been in Karachi for six days a couple of months ago. Looking at Pakistan from the outside, we usually perceive this country through what the media portrays it to be – a gory place full of violence. Thus, I already had a picture in my mind about Pakistan – but the image I had and the image I discovered there, were remarkably different. I am a 29-years-old Bangladeshi banker, working in one of the leading Pakistani banks in Dhaka, Bangladesh. When my department head told me that I would have to go to Karachi for training purposes, I was glad because ...

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London Olympics 2012: Our hockey team did no homework

Pakistan’s failure to qualify for the semi-finals wasn’t entirely unexpected — this team doesn’t have the potential to do better than this. Four years ago in Beijing, this very team, with the same bunch of players, finished eighth. This time again, a similar result is possible. I’d be surprised if people see the development as unexpected but the fact is that our build-up to the Olympics was marred by controversy, confusion and ill-planning. Seniors didn’t know whether they’d make it to the squad or not before they were slapped with fines. Their inclusion in the team was a last-minute decision and ...

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Education will be the solution to all our cricketing woes

Education is not just filling the bucket and ticking the boxes. It’s how a person is groomed, his personality developed and the learning ability instilled. It’s easier to teach a well-educated person tricks of the trade because he has developed a habit of picking up things quickly. The mind has been trained to adapt to different situations accordingly. Such qualities determine the development of a cricketer as well and can foretell whether that individual will be successful or not as a person. But that’s not all education does. The strength of decent education goes well beyond the development we just spoke of. It ...

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In FATA, radio is the only voice

Twice, I missed the cadet college test because the only source of news was newspapers, and the admissions news failed to reach me in time. Even today, students and the people of Fata don’t get news in real time. An international media development organization in Pakistan has trained the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (Fata) broadcasters on public service announcements (PSAs) in training sessions held in Islamabad Pakistan. Broadcasters from local radio stations have attended this five day, hands on training on PSAs. While PSAs are used widely elsewhere in the world, they have never been used by these stations in Pakistan ...

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A Belgian nun in Manghopir

It was wonderful to meet Sister Jeanine Geuns, a Belgian nun who has lived in Pakistan for 50 years and works at the Marie Adelaide Leprosy Centre, at the International Women’s Association tea for International Women’s Day. Sister Jeanine came out here at the age of 21, three days after her birthday, originally planned to be here for only three years, and has stayed on ever since. A short woman with close-cropped hair and remarkably clear skin and eyes, she’s determined and hard-working, speaks better Urdu than me, and wears a shalwar kameez. She lives in Manghopir and looks after the ...

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Save cricket in Pakistan

For a developing country like Pakistan, with a population of almost 190 million, sports play a vital role in developing the society on both social and ethical grounds. Although the national sport is hockey, cricket is the heart and soul of the whole nation. Taken as a platform to express feelings, every day history is made in the numerous cricket grounds across the country. As the game does not involve severe exercise, it is played by many and more recently the gender discrimination that used to exist has also ended. Cricket is amongst one of the few sports in the country played ...

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Grooming batsmen for all conditions

Our think-tank in the Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) should analyse the needs of the different formats of the game. The Pakistan cricket team shouldn’t just be a side that can play a good T20 match or an ODI – they should be prepared to play all the different versions of cricket, and the PCB  should prepare them accordingly. I am glad that under Misbahul Haq the team is finally learning the essentials of Test cricket. They are spending time in the middle and accumulating runs rather than treating it like a one-day match. The results are obvious; the team has started to perform consistently, and the ...

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