Stories about review

Taqwacore: rise of the Muslim punks

I discovered Michael Muhammad Knight while searching for some obscure punk bands on the internet. Clicking through different portals, spam pages and search engines I ended up on a page that stated The Taqwacores, with a drawing of a bearded man with a Mohawk sitting in the jalsa position saying his prayers. Muslim punks was a term I never thought I’d hear, but here it was, a fictitious manifesto depicting a person caught between rebellion and Islam, choosing both. I got hold of the book and went through it within a day. The book is written well enough to keep you ...

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Book review: Pride and Prejudice and Zombies

Title: Pride and Prejudice and Zombies Author: Seth Grahame-Smith and Jane Austen ISBN: 978-1-59474-334-4 Genre: Comedy, Parody, Classical Fiction Rating: 7/10 Outline: The story is set in Hertfordshire, wherein reside the Bennets, a family of five daughters, highly skilled in the ninja arts; their mother, highly anxious to marry them off; and their sardonic and amusing father.  Hertfordshire is, like the rest of England, currently overrun with hordes of the Undead, and the classic countryside atmosphere of the novel is punctuated with references to zombie massacres and carnage. Mrs Bennet’s matrimonial hopes for her daughters are excited when two young and eminently battleworthy men move ...

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How do such headlines get through?

What should I make of the following headline in Dawn, Images, June 27 for a movie review on The A-Team? Their regular reviewer (he seems to be writing for a number of years, though mostly forgettable reviews) Mohammad Kamran Jawaid wrote the piece, and I am assuming that he gave the headline which is: Man-on-man action and explosions (Incidentally, Mr Jawaid’s movie reviews invariably have a ‘Second opinion’ by someone by the name of Farheen Jawaid – and even if the two aren’t related I wonder why would you need a ‘second opinion’ to a movie reviews, especially by someone not very well known). Now ...

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Milan Kundera: high peaks, deep chasm

Who’d have expected an author’s fortunes in Hardywood to fluctuate so much with a single novel-screening? In the past, popular authors have been dumped unceremoniously, but has there ever been an author who, in a single novel-screening, has impressed the viewers greatly, and then, only a few hundred or so pages later been discarded with unspeakable disgust? Indeed a high peak, and then a deep chasm. Milan Kundera’s novel “The Book of Laughter and Forgetting” was the first translation screening in Hardywood; in that sense, his debut was historic: Hardywood has always been hesitant in allowing translated novels, believing that in ...

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