Stories about privacy

An open letter to Maya Khan

It started with this video. Dear Maya Khan, My name is Mehreen. I like browsing through morning talk shows when I’m waiting for breakfast made by my mom who, like your colleague said in a particular clip, is like my friend and I confide in her often. Sometimes I don’t. Sometimes I do. She’s never demanded an oath of eternal confidence in her. We’re humans, and we love our private space. You might be thinking, “Why is she telling me this?” I thought I should let you know about the knitty gritty of my personal life since you do enjoy delving ...

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Facebook Timeline: My life’s album!

The words “Wow”, and “Awesome”, took turns taking residence in my head as I first browsed through  ‘Facebook Timeline’, the upcoming Facebook user page revamp, scheduled to start rolling out in a few days. I was highly impressed by how a larger mish-mash of my personal information was presented to me in an attractive and intuitive package, and by how the new tools available to me were not only robust, but were placed exactly where I looked. So good was the design, in fact, that it took me less than a minute to master Facebook Timeline, which is a ...

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I love you, but you can’t have my password

I recently read a blog post about sharing personal e-mail accounts with your partners or spouse. The blog said about 33 per cent of women and 30 per cent of men share their online information with their partners. It also said that among unmarried couples, 10 per cent of the time, this led to a discovery of their partner’s infidelity. The figure was lower for married couples – about three per cent. The identity theft expert who gave these stats, Robert Siciliano, went on to warn that this figure was among those who had admitted to account sharing and discovering the infidelity ...

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Internet – the final frontier!

Not so long ago, a group of smart British MPs (236 to be exact), sitting on their cushiony green benches, decided to vote on and accept the Digital Economy Bill. The bill enabled copyright holders to block a household’s internet connection for downloading copyright material without permission. Quite naturally, the “criminals” were angered. Not to worry though. Shortly thereafter a group of  smart unknown coders, possibly sitting on their not-so-cushiony chairs of unknown colour, wrote an 86-line code to make bittorrents (choice method of downloading for “criminals” all over the world) untraceable. Joy returned to the e-world and all was ...

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