Stories about past

Another untold story

I walk down the road, Alone in the dark, Hiding my past, Hiding my face, Hiding what has left a mark.   Pointing fingers, Hurting words and each curse. All faith dies, Strength drown, And hopes disperse.   A blot has nested, A taint that is so weak yet so strong, I knock doors, Search whither I link, To whom I belong?   They left me forgotten, Forsaken in the crowd, To die with charge, To bury my voice under the shroud.   To conceal all secrets, To tuck away each word, To masquerade the truth, To let the story stay blurred.   My arms were locked and I tried to get lose, Holding on to my popping hopes, Burning with ...

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Where did Shab-e-Barat go?

Shab-e-Barat used to be my favourite festival. Yes, ‘festival’ and like all festivals, Shab-e-Barat was entertaining, fun and spiritual. And for a crazy kid growing up in Lahore during the 80s and 90s, it was probably a little adventurous and unsafe too. The local marketplace would host tens of stalls selling all kinds of fireworks known to man. All the kids in the neighbourhood would save their pocket money for months to be able to buy their fill of patakhay. The most popular fireworks included the Anaar (a fountain of fireworks), the Hawaiyaan (rockets) and the Bum (bombs, but not the kind that would explode and destroy half a city ...

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X-Men: Days of future past – Hollywood’s version of DDLJ?

Are you a Bollywood movie buff? Did you fall in love with Dilwale Dulhania Le Jayenge? (DDLJ) Did you pray for Simran to catch that train which Raj was lunging out of? The heaving, the pleading, those stretched arms, the intensity, that suspense and the never ending drama? And just when you thought you were about to have a nervous breakdown, Simran grabs on to Raj’s hand and tears of exuberance fall out of your eyes. Well, we have another DDLJ in town; please go watch X-Men: Days of Future Past. After watching the movie, I even checked online if they have changed the genre ...

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Pakistan, the illusions of a glorious past and kafan chor

Times don’t really change much over the centuries. Or so I felt after reading one of the aphorisms or ‘hikayaat’ of one of the medieval times poet and thinker, Sheikh Saadi. It goes like this… Once upon a time, there used to be an evil, wretched man in a small town, who used to steal ‘kafan’ (white cloth used as a shroud to wrap the dead bodies) right after burial from the local graveyard. His means of income, therefore, involved opening up fresh graves, desecrating the dead for a meagre amount of money that he would get by selling the white cloth in the ...

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Real Madrid’s La Decima: The dream is now a reality

I’ve been following Real Madrid for the past four years and I endured a number of heartbreaks at the most crucial stages of the season. For three consecutive years, the team withstood painful defeats throughout the semi-finals of the most important club tournament, the UEFA Champions League. Since the past 12 years, the dream to achieve La Decima always seemed to come to an abrupt halt. The last two editions of the tournament were miserable but this year, Real Madrid did what was always expected of them. They won it and they won it the Real Madrid style; ‘fight till the end’. Real Madrid ...

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Lip smacking Gobi Manchurian and songs that take you back in time…

“Ajeeb dastaan hai yeh Kahan shuroo kahan khatam Yeh manzilein hain kaunsee Na who samajh sakey na hum” (What an odd story this is Where does it start and where does it end What are these destinations Neither could they understand nor I) Songs always take me away into a labyrinth of memories. They bridge the hazy connections, remind us of those deep associations, complete the euphoria, and let us relive the lovely and not so lovely moments with people, places and the past. One such song that I recently heard took me back to Singapore, to a friend who introduced us to a ‘desi’ Indian Chinese restaurant ...

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Painting happy portraits won’t erase your past, George W Bush!

Pablo Picasso once said, “Painting is a blind man’s profession. He paints not what he sees but what he feels; what he tells himself about what he has seen.” The 46th ex-governor of Texas as well as the 43rd former president of the United States (from 2001 to 2009) and now an artist, George W Bush has surprised the world with his first ever solo art exhibition ingeniously titled ‘The Art of Leadership – A President’s Personal Diplomacy’. The exhibition opened at the George Bush Presidential Library and Museum in Dallas and it will run from April 5 through June 3, 2014. Former president Bush, who has taken ...

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Hate taking notes in class? Use the Cogi app!

Technology has advanced tremendously over the past decade. However, even today, we use paper to record important details, whether it is jotting down important points during a meeting or taking notes during class lectures. Even journalists use shorthand to remember important points during press conferences along with the aid of video and audio recordings. However, the problem arises when one has to dig out all their handwritten, haphazard material to find relevant points for use after the event or class is over. This exercise is often time consuming and frustrating to undertake. Fortunately, Cogi.com has presented a very simple solution to this issue. At first, the ...

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Neelam Ghar and Kasauti: Change is not always a good thing

Recently, I was flicking through the local channels when my fingers suddenly stopped on Pakistan Television (PTV) – our once-glorious national channel is now on permanent crutches, a tragic outcome of trying to keep up with modern trends. And amid such handicaps, there he was, the immortalised Mr Tariq Aziz, boisterously putting up questions of general knowledge. Agile and above 60, he would race towards an enthusiastic audience that could be cajoled into doing anything for him, from playing age-old games like musical chairs to participating in Urdu poetry competitions. One of his famous chants still echoed in the auditorium as ...

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Sindh Festival 2014: ‘Culture’ is not a spectacle to be sold, neither can it disguise past failure

The Sindh Festival 2014 is not a beacon of hope; it is a reminder of just how far behind we are lagging. Perhaps it is because of my deep Sindhi roots, my familial history and my life experiences but I don’t think that the Sindh Festival 2014 is anything worth celebrating. I have lived in Hyderabad for 14 years followed by five years in Karachi and the distinction between the two cities is clear – Hyderabad is more Sindhi centric culturally while Karachi is more of a melting pot. Neither one is better than the other but they are both different. In Hyderabad, spectacles similar to ...

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