Stories about newspaper

TV rhetoric: Shut up and say something

“Censorship ends in logical completeness when nobody is allowed to read any books except the books that nobody reads.” These words by George Bernard Shaw seem familiar. Aren’t we living in a society where every word we read has a background? The audacity of expression has been long lost and we have also lost the courage to read what we wish – to read what is not considered “essential reading,” to read something that is not a must for floating in the sea of absurdity around us. Do we need to change this? Yes, we do. Spectators of our own history Our ...

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The keyboard mafia

Over the past few months I have been paying close attention to the comment mafia. Mind you, they do not attack regular newspaper reports, but the pistols come roaring out for blogs and op-ed pieces. In blogs there is a bit of professional rivalry. If a certain popular blogger has received a high number of comments then others bloggers will start commenting tearing his/her piece apart. One would find something like this: Frustrated201: What crap! KhiGurl: I agree with Frustrated! [email protected]: I concur…with Frustrated and KhiGurl. They are so right. These hate commenter’s travel in packs. They will leave derogatory (but not abusive) comments on each ...

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How do such headlines get through?

What should I make of the following headline in Dawn, Images, June 27 for a movie review on The A-Team? Their regular reviewer (he seems to be writing for a number of years, though mostly forgettable reviews) Mohammad Kamran Jawaid wrote the piece, and I am assuming that he gave the headline which is: Man-on-man action and explosions (Incidentally, Mr Jawaid’s movie reviews invariably have a ‘Second opinion’ by someone by the name of Farheen Jawaid – and even if the two aren’t related I wonder why would you need a ‘second opinion’ to a movie reviews, especially by someone not very well known). Now ...

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Making editorial pages from scratch

My last job was at The News where I edited their editorial pages for more than three and a half years. It was an interesting time at the paper and there was a tug-of-war between various sections of the publication. For instance, the Karachi edition was run by the thoroughly professional and sensible Talat Aslam (who had prior to that edited Herald for a number of years) and its front page was decidedly saner than its counterparts in Islamabad and Karachi. The organisation, editorially, at The News was different. Each city edition has its own editor and each edition ...

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The not-so-glamorous job of a reporter

It is a tough job, sometimes, for reporters like me. Generally, we need to be in a position where we can remotely or even acutely be in touch with a high-profile person of our area of interest. If it’s a political reporter, he has to have access to the higher ups in the political arena; sports reporters should be able to interact with sportsmen and a reporter designated to cultural and art fields is bound to be in a capacity to know all the faces of the ‘glam’ entertainment world. While others might rejoice reading a piece and think it lucky ...

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