Stories about legacy

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom is an action-adventure, but mindless-bore would equally suffice

Back in the early 90s, when the original Jurassic Park first came out, I never got the chance to watch it right away. Make no mistake, this dinosaur galore was the biggest deal in terms of flicks making rounds back then. As a result, for years, I was mocked left, right and centre by dino-fans for missing out on this particular Steven Spielberg masterpiece. To be perfectly honest, I wasn’t in the least bit bothered by my self-imposed failure to give it a watch. But years later, when a younger dino-phile cousin of mine was in town, I finally found myself ...

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Can Nawaz Sharif salvage his legacy by normalising relations with India and the economic alleviation stemming from it?

The battle lines have been drawn. Nawaz is out flaunting his muscles on the street, and his choice seems clear – defiance over acquiescence. But to what end? One possibility is that the power play is simply intended to gain political leverage and bargain relief from those the former prime minster (PM) feels have vindictively disarmed him. But two factors refute this theory – Khawaja Asif and Mushahidullah Khan. We all know the perversity with which Asif is viewed within the General Headquarters (GHQ), and the comments that led Khan to be scapegoated and removed from his ministry. The appointment of the two ...

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Does Aitchison give more importance to kinship than KGS?

Before we go on to tackle the issue of kinship and its importance in maintaining a certain decorum, atmosphere and legacy of an institute, let’s go back and take a quick lesson about an institution steeped in rich history, namely the Aitchison College. Aitchison College was founded on January 2, 1886, as the Punjab Chief’s college, and was renamed the Aitchison College on November 3, of the same year. The foundation stone of the new building (now known as the old building) was laid down by the Earl of Dufferin and Ava. The college is named after the (then) Lt Governor ...

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The queen of hearts lives on… even today

The legend of the late Princess of Wales, Princess Diana, lives on in the form of Prince William, Princess Kate and Prince George. History seemed to repeat itself when the royal family took a tour of Australia recently, where Diana and Prince Charles took their historic six-week voyage in 1983 with baby William two years into their marriage. Although the obsession with celebrities wasn’t that deep during that era, the excursion was overwhelming for the shy and insecure Diana, who was unaware of the media savvy princess that she would eventually blossom into. Royal tours can be immensely stressful, unnerving and intimidating ...

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Education will not end wife beating, Pakistan needs a cultural shift

Domestic violence – a truly horrific term, to which only its victims can truly relate, is another one of the many plagues Pakistan suffers from. Honestly, I had never thought much about it. I knew what it meant and I knew it existed but that was the extent of my thoughts on the matter, probably because I have never experienced or witnessed it and so I could not relate to it. Or probably because, like so many of us, the bubble of my privileged social setup never gave me a window into this terrifying reality that engulfs many women. But the biggest ...

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Chief Justice Iftikhar Chaudhry, our man of vision and courage

The time for Mr Justice Iftikhar Chaudhry, the Chief Justice of Pakistan (CJP), has come to an end. Like him or loathe him, the fact remains that the CJP has managed to stay in the news constantly since 2007 and he has managed to create quite a following for himself. He is, after all, the same man who went into a room with an army general and refused to resign when he was asked to do so on March 9, 2007. Instead he stuck by his guns and what followed was the beginning of the movement for the freedom of judiciary which ...

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What next for our men in black?

Rarely has a man in Pakistan polarised opinion so regularly. To his supporters, he is a superhero who steps in every time things start to fall apart in Pakistan. To his critics, he is power hungry and has overstepped his authority multiple times. Justice Iftikhar Muhammad Chaudhry is set to retire on December 11, 2013. Or at least that is what the plan is so far. In a country like Pakistan, plans seem to fall apart more often than not. However if all sense prevails, Iftikhar Chaudhry will sleep on the night of December 11, 2013, knowing that he won’t need ...

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Pep Guardiola: Respect to a living legend

Barcelona talisman and manager Pep Guardiola recently announced that he would not be continuing in his managerial role at Barcelona beyond the end of this season. I cannot even begin to describe the profound effect he had on Barcelona and the world of football itself. Josep Guardiola i Sala or ‘Pep’ as they call him, was born in Santpedor; a relatively small town in central Catalonia, Spain. Pep’s rise in football was quite a fairy-tale. He started out working as a ball-boy for FC Barcelona – little did anyone know that this ordinary ball-boy would one day end up as manager of ...

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Steve Jobs: You die, and everybody loves you

Fact: If you’re dead, suddenly everybody loves you – Grouchy Rabbit. Especially if you are an American billionaire that made shiny consumerism cool in ways unprecedented. Or at least that’s what the global wave of mourning that engulfed us in the aftermath of Steve Jobs death would have us believe. The dotted I’s went up in solidarity for a man who was hailed as a legend, a visionary or in some extreme cases, a prophet. His dogma offered you a bite off the forbidden fruit, a guilt free morsel of the sweetest thing you will ever taste if you have the ...

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Overcoming our colonial legacy

On August 12, Pakistan finally came to grips with its colonial legacy. The Frontier Crimes Regulation (FCR), a draconian law framed by British to govern the ‘unruly tribal areas’ on the border with Afghanistan has finally been scrapped. The British viewed the frontier regions as a buffer zone for the empire, beyond which lay the territories of Afghanistan. The frontier tribes were never brought under complete suzerainty of Britain, although indirect rule was exercised through tribal chiefs and intermediaries. The Pashtuns, historically allergic to foreign occupation offered strong resistance to the British. Thus naturally, the brutes and savages had to be ...

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