Stories about karl marx

“What a man was born”: Reading Fahmida Riaz’s heartfelt tribute to Karl Marx on his 202nd birthday

Karl Marx was born on May 5th, 1818 – 202 years ago today – in the German city of Trier located along the bank of the Moselle stream, a tributary of the river Rhine. In 1883, a crowd gathered for Marx’s funeral in a London cemetery – a crowd of eleven, counting the undertaker. His great friend Friedrich Engels had been quite right while speaking at Marx’s funeral, “Marx was above all else a revolutionist. His real mission in life was to contribute, in one way or another, to the overthrow of capitalist society and of the state institutions which ...

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Covid-19 infects neoliberalism: Is the state making a comeback? – Part II

Read Part I in this series here. ~ For five decades conservative neoliberalism, the most faithful denomination of the capitalist creed, has demonstrated an outstanding resolve in denying the social and environmental calamities borne out of itself. This denial is usually laced with a paranoia of a leftist takeover. It does not blot out its contempt and explicit suspicion for any policy – climate change or welfare state – that attempts to rightfully regulate or control the behemothic market. According to Richard Rothschild, former Carroll County Commissioner, climate change policies are, “an attack on middle-class American capitalism. To what extent is this entire movement ...

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Covid-19 infects neoliberalism: Is the state making a comeback? – Part I

Read Part II in this series here. ~ Once the climate crisis precipitated a raging atmosphere of adversity towards neoliberalism, it’s the novel coronavirus that is now transmuting neoliberalism’s left-wing critique into a pandemic like itself. To provide some context, if the reigning order of the world system could be defined in two words, the politically popular and pontifical phrase, economic liberalism, otherwise called liberal capitalism, would be it. It’s philosophe-architect, the neoclassical Chicago School of Economics, perhaps did not know in the 1930s that it was designing an ideological leviathan that no one would be able to beat by the turn of ...

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Pakistan’s burgeoning intellectual dilemma

Normally, we think of knowledge as an activity which is shorn off from society in the libraries and laboratories of thinkers and scientists. On the contrary, production of knowledge is very much connected to the prevailing mindset and cultural ethos which directly influences our perception and reception of knowledge. It is this very mindset that has contributed to the poor state of human sciences in Pakistan – where these subjects have essentially been assigned a marginal status at the higher education level, as compared to natural sciences. Instead of engaging with complex ideas, we reject them by stating that they are ...

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In conversation with President Arif Alvi: ‘Pakistan’s fourth industrial revolution is here’

Dr Arif Alvi is an acquired taste. He isn’t your typical flash in the pan Pakistani politician who rides his 1,000-watt charisma to answer difficult questions. Instead, Alvi is that rare Pakistani leader whose substance overwhelms his style. He quotes ideas from Plato, Maulana Maududi, Karl Marx and Thomas Piketty with equal ease. Even if you’re a resident of his former constituency in Karachi’s Defence area, you might not know that he was shot twice while protesting against Ayub Khan’s military rule. I got the opportunity to interview the president over Eid at the Governor’s House in Karachi. We had ...

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“A Moses without manifestation, a Christ without a cross”: Karl Marx as remembered by Wamiq Jaunpuri

“The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways. The point, however, is to change it.” – Karl Marx Europe in the 19th century gave birth to two thinkers who changed everything about how we see the world. One was Charles Darwin. The other was Karl Marx, who was born 201 years ago today. Darwin discovered the law of evolution of plants and animals (the law of natural selection and survival of the fittest), while Marx sought the law of evolution of human history. Darwin’s discoveries sparked a revolution in the scientific world, while Marx’s discoveries illuminated the pathways to ...

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What independence are we celebrating?

Some 71 years ago, people from all over subcontinent left their homes and took roads laced with perils to reach the ‘land of pure’. What made them leave their lives behind to move to an unknown land where all that awaited them was a promise? No tangible shelter but only a promise; the promise of freedom. What is meant by this ‘freedom’ that caused the greatest migration of the century? Freedom or independence means the availability of the opportunity to exercise one’s rights, powers, desires and even faith. Yes, I put emphasis on faith because any country where any ...

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The Limehouse Golem: When Jack the Ripper meets Sherlock Holmes for a Victorian gothic mystery

The Victorian era gothic mystery, The Limehouse Golem, will remind you of a number of Alfred Hitchcock’s directorial rudiments. These include his famous methods of handling the suspense rather than utilising the milieu of surprise, the redirection of guilt, and most importantly, the MacGuffin technique, where a pleasant felon pursues certain ambition. Director and writer Juan Carlos Medina adapted this film from English author Peter Ackroyd’s novel Dan Leno and the Limehouse Golem (1994). His film’s theme can easily be linked to a plot pocketed from Jack the Ripper’s mystery murders, with lots of Sherlock Holmes effects. It has lavish baroque amalgamation of real historical ...

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Tarek Fatah’s recent tantrum: What two celebrities name their child

Unless you’re fairly active on Twitter, and/or have a genuine interest in expat Pakistanis who are active within sociopolitical circles, you might not be aware of who Tarek Fatah is. Originally from Karachi but now based in Canada, he writes a regular column for one of the country’s largest newspapers and has a frequent broadcast presence. In addition to this, he is a staunch critic of virtually everything Pakistan. His criticism of Pakistan has its merits. However there are times where the gap between the truth and what Tarek Fatah perceives to be the truth is larger than the Grand ...

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Does the on-going Kashmir “movement” lack a plan of action?

In Why Did the ‘Twitter Revolutions’ Fail?, an article published in the New York Times last year, Ivan Krastev couches his set of arguments in a thought-provoking manner by referring to history. He writes that, immediately after the 1851 Paris coup by Napoleon, some of the greatest political minds from Europe, including Karl Marx (a communist), Pierre Joseph Proudhon (an anarchist), Victor Hugo (a romantic), Alexis de Tocqueville and Walter Bagehot (the liberals) hustled to their reading rooms to understand the Paris coup and draw philosophical conclusions out of such events. To quote Ivan, “Their interpretations of the coup were as different ...

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