Stories about electricity

She left me on my wedding day

We had been together since forever. I always respected her and cared for her feelings. It was a perfect relationship between us. I still can’t live without her. Whenever she’d get angry, she would stop talking for a couple of hours; my whole body would go tense and I would sweat like crazy after. She had given me light all my life. Sometimes she mysteriously disappeared but always came back to me. A couple of days ago, she went missing for a good two days. I called her house many times, but there was no answer. I found out that she had been ...

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And then there was light, thank you WAPDA

Thank you, WAPDA; thank you for these two hours of continuous electricity. I was about to blow out the candle and go to sleep Santa ─ you like being called Santa, right? Considering you love to shower us with unexpected electricity flow as presents when you feel like it. So, in return for this generosity, I thought I should probably write you a little thank you note. I know I have been a bad boy lately, going to bed as late as eight when it’s already dark by six, but then it’s your laxity that’s to blame. Why supply electricity for two continuous ...

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Power crisis in Larkana

The menace of loadshedding is experienced across the country. Surprisingly however, irrespective of this alarming power shortage, the elite still enjoy uninterrupted power supply. Twelve to fifteen hours of loadshedding occurs in Larkana alone which is the centre of trade and industry. It’s also the stronghold of the PPP and the hometown of former prime ministers, Zulfikar Ali Bhutto and his daughter, Benazir Bhutto. Irked with this step-motherly treatment, Larkana’s traders and industrialists observed a shutter-down strike, carried out a protest rally and staged a sit-in on June 12. The traders protested against discriminatory loadshedding because according to them, the ...

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Power to the people: Pakistan’s mismanagement of energy

After years of mismanagement and neglect, Pakistan’s electricity supply is almost giving up the struggle. Just as the summer heat is taking its toll, daily blackouts are being imposed for up to 18 to 20 hours a day. This is creating major disruptions to commerce and industry, adding drastically to inflation and unemployment, causing further distress and unrest to the people of Pakistan. The problem has been in the making for many years. The gap between supply and demand is now estimated at 40% because of an aged and inadequate infrastructure; a lack of foresight or planning and inadequate investment ...

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Just how powerless are we?

As a child, the smell of a blown-out candle was among the sweetest of fragrances that I knew. Not because my mind equated it with birthdays, but because it signalled that the power was back on. It would begin with the sudden disappearance of Mario from the television screen smack in the middle of a boss level, amidst a chorus of frustrated interjections from me and my cousins Grandfather would then light a gas lantern fixed in the living room wall, as well as some candles strategically spread around the ground floor. Occasionally, there’d be a petrified little kid stuck in the bathroom ...

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Education must not be ignored in the next budget

Recently, Prime Minister Yousaf Raza Gilani announced the government’s top priorities for the next budget. Electricity and employment top the list. Although this is all good news, I would like to ask our premier, what about education?  Without a doubt, the electricity crisis is the most important issue Pakistan is facing right now. The country is suffering immeasurably due to shortage of electric power and our economic wheel has stopped. However, this issue is as old as our current government. Four years have gone by, but our government has yet to take serious notice of the crisis. As elections are expected during the ...

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5 steps to solving Pakistan’s energy crisis

Out of all the problems we face as a country, energy seems to be the one that annoys us the most. It’s not that other issues are not important or are somehow less annoying; it is just that every single person in Pakistan uses energy in one form or another and hence is directly affected by it at a very personal level. So when a few days back I was invited as an expert delegate to the PML-N’s energy conference , I was pleasantly surprised that our political parties are beginning to showing signs of maturity and started talking issues. The ...

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The Pakistan-Iran pipedream

For a government often accused of indecision and weakness, Islamabad has been strikingly defiant about its determination to pursue a natural gas pipeline deal with Iran. Pakistan’s strident tone has not changed in light of Washington’s heightened sanctions regime vis-à-vis Iran, which bans countries from having commercial transactions with Tehran. The foreign ministry has declared that the sanctions do not affect the pipeline project. Other Pakistanis, however, fear that the sanctions may well present problems. One prominent lawyer has suggested Islamabad go so far as to lobby the UN to ensure the ...

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Circle of life

Feelings of being enraged; feelings of wanting to go out on to the streets and protest (not in a revolutionary mood though); feelings of smacking someone right in the middle of their head; feelings of sometimes shouting out loud in a helpless cry, and sometimes in a defeated sombre sigh. These are just some of the feelings, when the letters C, E, S and K are arranged in the order of KESC. I can already sense disgusted frowns appearing on some faces. Those not in Karachi probably have a victorious smirk on, or are thanking the Lord for His graciousness – aren’t you happy ...

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De(bt)ocracy is the best revenge

In a cosmetic democracy like Pakistan, the quest for securing or preserving political power is doomed to end in failure without a nod from the establishment which is the power behind the throne. Whether the regime is military or civilian, the establishment needs to have a political constituency. This explains why every military government in Pakistan cultivates relations with some political forces and tries to cobble together a political arrangement to further its interest. In my opinion, democracy in Pakistan is “off” the people, “far” the people “buy” the people! Talking of democracy reminds me of Bilawal Bhutto when, on ...

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