Stories about breakfast

This winter, cuddle under the blanket with a warm slice of this carrot cake

The temperatures are falling. It is getting colder by the day – the perfect weather to enjoy several mugs of coffee, cuddled under a cosy throw blanket by the window while enjoying a good book. For me winters would be incomplete without carrot cake. I am all for cooking healthy food, but some of the best desserts combine a bit from both worlds. Now, I’m not claiming that carrot cake is healthy. But it can’t be bad with all those good ingredients in it, right? The great thing about this cake (apart from it being extremely delicious) is how easy it ...

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So you think cinnamon cream-cheese rolls are difficult to make?

I had just gotten done with my exams, on an endless rainy morning ,when I came across the idea of cinnamon cream-cheese rolls on Pinterest. I saw the lovely photos and decided that I had to make this right away! This is the perfect thing for a lazy weekend breakfast because it is easy and quick to make, and tastes absolutely great as well. My rolls don’t resemble perfectly smooth roll-ups, because the bread that I used didn’t have exact square pieces, therefore I had to improvise by trying to trim the crust off neatly. I failed miserably and somehow forgot to dip the ...

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This beautiful cheese soufflé will take your taste-buds all the way to France!

I was really wanting to surprise my mother on Mother’s Day with a fancy breakfast in bed, hence I searched for the perfect breakfast menu and discovered that egg is the one staple ingredient used in all breakfasts, so I had to somehow include it in my menu as well. While searching for the perfect breakfast, I came across a recipe of cheese soufflé. The best part about this recipe was that there was no need to go and buy additional ingredients, since they were already stacked in my pantry. Moreover, my love for the French culture motivated me to try ...

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Appeasing the meat-eater in you with this Pakistani styled stir-fried spicy minced meat

As a kid I was never a mutton, beef or milk fan. I was scolded a tonne by Ammi and Nana (maternal grandfather) for that. I was told that I would never grow tall enough or excel in class or be physically fit. Turns out, I achieved all of that without eating much meat protein throughout my adolescent years. However, something else happened as well. As I became an adult and moved away from Pakistan, the flavours and tastes that I took for granted came back to me as a longing. I missed eating the very things I despised as a kid. And mutton was one of ...

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An ‘Hummazing’ way to eat right in Ramazan

Chop the veggies, whip up gram flour with seasoning, make a paste with water, dip the veggies and fry! Fasting and pakoras are insanely intertwined. Roadside vendors, kiosks, and general stores – all have flaming hot oil pans, centered neatly on busy roads, frying away these crunchy, deep mustard, vegetable fritter devils. Admittedly, they are best eaten after a hot day of fasting, right after gobbling up a mushy sweet date and right before sipping a deep red cold drink. The scrunch, the spice and the saltiness are all addictive. But I protest against this addiction. And this alluded me to think ...

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Broccoli cheese cups: Looks like a cupcake, tastes divine and the kids love it too!

“I know you’re 37…” beamed my daughters’ (very suave) teacher when I went to her school the other day.  At a recent blood donation camp at my daughters’ school, all the students were briefed on the importance of donating blood, who all can and should donate. When told that the minimum age for donating blood was 18, my seven-year-old very confidently volunteered, “Oh my mother can donate blood (perhaps twice) she is 37”. At home, she insisted her dad volunteers too, since it was taken for granted that Mum would be going. However, when she saw blood draining (pun intended) from her father’s ...

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In Bhakkar, breakfast is Tiffany

People eat strange things. In Southeast Asia, insects are a delicacy and in East Asia, the same goes for dogs. Pig meat, a major source of protein in the diets of many peoples, are taboo for Muslims and Jews. The same applies to the noble cow for Hindus. The reasons for these differences are manifold. So before we get ahead of ourselves, it is important to agree that ‘food’ is not an easily defined word. In Bhakkar, two brothers were arrested for desecrating a grave. While saddening, it is not really the worst of crimes. But that is only because under Pakistani ...

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Four cups of tea: Bringing people together for years

“If you want to thrive in Baltistan, you must respect our ways. The first time you share tea with a Balti, you are a stranger. The second time, you are an honoured guest. The third time, you become family, and for our family, we are prepared to do anything, even die. Dr Greg, you must take time to share three cups of tea. We may be uneducated but we are not stupid. We have lived and survived here for a long time.” – Three Cups of Tea. Last week became a little strange. First, the Express Tribune blogs team asked if I would be ...

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Sunday mornings with aloo ke parathay and chai!

Savoury aloo walay parathay and hot, sweet, milky tea have an unbreakable connection to winter in my head. The reason could be growing up in Pakistan; that’s how it used to be in our house. Waking up late on Sunday morning meant it was too late for breakfast and too early for lunch.  But the rumbling tummy could not be ignored. And so, chilly, winter Sunday mornings called for potato-stuffed buttered parathas for brunch served with shami kebabs or Pakistani style spicy omelettes. In my mother’s household all parathas were prepared either with home-churned white butter or with homemade desi ghee (clarified butter). As a little girl I remember watching my nani (maternal grandmother) ...

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When we were too poor to afford Blue Band margarine

I still remember the day that Blue Band margarine was introduced to Alamdar Bakery in my home-town of Quetta, Pakistan. The glossy silver packaging and the light blue printing stood out among all the other butter in the bakery’s refrigerator. However, I refrained from taking an interest in this new product since I was well aware that my parents would not be able to afford it. I continued to consume the inexpensive Liaquat Makkhan for breakfast even after the older brother of the baker recommended Blue Band with great zeal; I consoled myself by thinking that he was just trying to improve his sales. As the weeks ...

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