The colours of Kashmir

Published: November 29, 2014
Email

Fall is season of colours in Kashmir valley. PHOTO: SHEIKH FIRDOUS

The harud (autumn) is when the hustle and bustle in Kashmir villages begin with the season of harvest. The green turns to gold and then to russet and red; leaves fall to melodious cracking sounds under the feet of passers-by beneath the shades of the Chinar (maple) trees.

Autumn, the indication of a long winter season in Kashmir, is marked by a crimson yellow on the Chinar trees. In Kashmir, the season in September, October and November can be dry, wet or windy. With the decrease in temperature, it’s the season when the maple trees turn into bonfires and leaves start falling from them.

Photo: Sheikh Firdous

Fall is a season of mists and mellow fruitfulness, and the crimson red-carpeted gardens in Kashmir are a feast for the eyes. In the countryside farmers harvest paddy, and are quite busy with the apple picking in their orchards; these are indicators of the breath-taking beauty and grandeur of Fall in Kashmir.

Photo journalist Sheikh Firdous captures the life in season of colours in Kashmir.

1) Autumn is a celebration; bonfire of Chinar tree is a feast for children as they love the melody of crackling sound under their feet.

Photo: Sheikh Firdous

2) The crimson yellow, gold, russet and red hues of autumn, all provide an eye-catching season for tourists to visit Kashmir.

Photo: Sheikh Firdous

3) Many believe that the maple trees were brought to Kashmir from Iran; others say they have been brought from Greece.

Photo: Sheikh Firdous

4) In the season of harvest the families on the countryside work as a team.

Photo: Sheikh Firdous

5) The locals in Kashmir produce coal from dried-up leaves and dried branches of trees, so that they can use it in the firepot (kanger), during the chilling cold in winter season.

Photo: Sheikh Firdous

6) A woman gathers dry leaves into a heap with her broom to make coal for kangris (earthen firepots used in winter season) at Naseem Bagh, here in Indian-administered Kashmir.

Photo: Sheikh Firdous

7) The famous Urdu poet, Allama Iqbal, described the Chinar in autumn as ‘Aatish-e-Chinar’ (the Chinar on fire).

Photo: Sheikh Firdous

8) Be it snow, far-flung hamlets, lush green meadows or fresh water bodies, the Kashmir valley has always been a major fascination for tourists across the globe.

Photo: Sheikh Firdous

9) The season of fall provides a distinct joy.

Photo: Sheikh Firdous

Fall is the season of colours in the Kashmir valley. Come visit and behold the wonders yourself!

Tahir Ibn Manzoor

Tahir Ibn Manzoor

A freelance writer/blogger from Indian-administered Kashmir. He tweets @TahirIbnManzoor (twitter.com/TahirIbnManzoor)

The views expressed by the writer and the reader comments do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of The Express Tribune.