Afridi’s opinion on women is none of your business!

Published: March 11, 2014
SHARES
Email

The fact that he prefers women to stay in the kitchen is his personal opinion, just like your personal opinions, such as being for or against housemaids, working women or homemakers, or even believing or not believing in God. PHOTO: REUTERS

The fact that he prefers women to stay in the kitchen is his personal opinion, just like your personal opinions, such as being for or against housemaids, working women or homemakers, or even believing or not believing in God. PHOTO: REUTERS The fact that he prefers women to stay in the kitchen is his personal opinion, just like your personal opinions, such as being for or against housemaids, working women or homemakers, or even believing or not believing in God. PHOTO: REUTERS The fact that he prefers women to stay in the kitchen is his personal opinion, just like your personal opinions, such as being for or against housemaids, working women or homemakers, or even believing or not believing in God. PHOTO: AFP

Just when we think we are over it, it starts all over again. Another video goes viral over social websites, attracts conversations and often takes you nowhere but through a vicious circle of ongoing rebuttals. This time it’s Shahid Afridi under attack.

So here goes, it starts with Afridi making a grand comeback, surprising us with his performance in matches against India and Bangladesh. Suddenly, all the loyalty towards him is regained. Then come all the memes about him against Virat Kohli, Indian fans, Bangladeshi fans and the likes.

In between the hundreds of comments, we see people praying for Afridi to have a son now after three daughters. One of these, I specifically remember, was about praying for a baby boy for the happiness of a man who made the whole nation happy. Too many assumptions here, but let’s just stick to the basic one:

Afridi wants a boy.

May be he doesn’t. May be he does.

After his recent video about what many call ‘sexist’ comments, maybe he does want a son. Saying that, however, would be another unwarranted assumption.

The minute-long video clip in discussion features an interview of Afridi where he’s asked about his opinion on women’s cricket in Peshawar. Anyone who has even a little idea about the connection of Peshawar, women and militants, would agree it was not an easy question to answer. The question asked for an opinion about a seemingly dangerous territory. Call it the curse of the new media, but the video now being circulated over social networks has incited much dialogue and, in some case, outrage.

But before we go too far, let me ask you one thing.

Why is Afridi’s personal life or opinion your business?

The fact that he prefers women to stay in the kitchen is his personal opinion, just like your personal opinions, such as being for or against housemaids, working women or homemakers, or even believing or not believing in God.

For me, the argument that, as a celebrity, Afridi will influence young minds to follow his opinions does not hold any merit. Your stance on issues such as a woman’s position primarily comes as part of your upbringing than media statements of celebrities.

How, then, does his opinion affect you?

And why is he supposed to have politically right opinions just because he’s been dubbed as a ‘hero’, just like many other sportsmen.

His job is to play cricket, not make statements about women’s liberation. Questions around such controversial topics are bound to create different opinions, and hence controversy, which I think was the whole point of the host asking this particular question, in what was otherwise, a sports interview.

Bombarding celebrities with opinion-based questions and then expecting they won’t express their opinion is expecting too much.

I know the fad around Afridi but his fans and others really need to take it easy. As fans, you don’t have to justify his statements or get disappointed. For others, there’s a thing called tolerance for different opinions.

If you can’t handle that, you can’t criticise them either.

Do you think Shahid Afridi has a responsibility towards fans when voicing his opinion?

     View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

Farwa.Zahra

Farwa Zahra

Farwa Zahra is a Qatar-based journalist. She has studied Gender and Media at the London School of Economics. She tweets as @syedaz (twitter.com/syedaz)

The views expressed by the writer and the reader comments do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of The Express Tribune.

  • ajay gupta

    A public figure needs to b politically correct in public, whatever his views may b in pvt. Given the sad status of women in pakistan, such views strengthen the hands of those who want to reinforce the stereotype. Like it or not, the elite in any society do have a role in shaping opinions n ideas. And if his opinions r not meant to invite public comment, why was the interview aired publicly? A pvt copy shud have been given to afridi instead.Recommend

  • ajay gupta

    A public figure needs to b politically correct in public, whatever his views may b in pvt. Given the sad status of women in pakistan, such views strengthen the hands of those who want to reinforce the stereotype. Like it or not, the elite in any society do have a role in shaping opinions n ideas. And if his opinions r not meant to invite public comment, why was the interview aired publicly? A pvt copy shud have been given to afridi instead.Recommend

  • Gingo

    Why you lambasted Aamir Liaquat in one of your previous blogs? Wasn’t he expressing his opinions just like how in your opinion Afridi was expressing his?
    As a well known athlete with millions of fan following, Mr Afridi and his supporters should know that his words are counter productive and have the potential to damage the already fragile image of women in workplace in a country like Pakistan.Recommend

  • Sane

    I am shocked you being a women supportive of his patriarchal views. Pakistan or any country where women rights are suppressed needs support to uplift women, he being respresentive of Pakistan in field of cricket as well as citizen of your country have certain social responsibility towards his people like any other citizen , instead of questioning his Stone Age thinking as a celebrity ” woman best for roti theory ” you are saying why ask celebs such questions” why not? Isn’t he part of your society?. “People think he as celeb can influence minds” I am not bothered about his influence on people, I am more bothered as to why u are questioning people who are challenging such regressive attitude. As modern society We need to question and question till we chalenge and finish such regressive mentality pulling woman back. U say “he’s entitled to have an opinion” so are people in expressing their disgust over his medieval thinking..why question them then?Recommend

  • New wave

    Ajay Gupta, well said, can’t agree more !Recommend

  • Malti Chaturvedi

    its still better than CII’s ideology of not consenting first wife before marrying second…..say what?Recommend

  • Sofia

    He could’ve just said that It’s something to do with every individual’s right be it man or woman and come out of it, instead, of saying something that will put women in a more difficult situation in this not-so-women-friendly society.

    P.S. claiming that celebrities’ opinions don’t influence people’s is a mere B.S.Recommend

  • Ali S

    Afridi is also known to attend ‘dars’ and bayans (religious gatherings) mosques in Karachi, his wife wears a niqab and his family is from FATA, so nobody should be the least bit surprised about this. He does always seems to be beaming with joy whenever he’s with his beautiful daughters though, so I don’t think he meant that as disrespectful towards women, but his cultural values are very conservative and he’s often made that clear in various TV shows.Recommend

  • parasitamol

    Totally agreed with the author. It’s his own opinion and should not in any way become a matter of public resentment. And if one looks at Afridi’s opinion, he, very diplomatically answered his question without disagreeing with the interviewer and expressed his opinion which should be respected by fans or otherwise.Recommend

  • parasitamol

    Totally agreed with the author. It’s his own opinion and should not in any way become a matter of public resentment. And if one looks at Afridi’s opinion, he, very diplomatically answered his question without disagreeing with the interviewer and expressed his opinion which should be respected by fans or otherwise.Recommend

  • Needroos

    Veena Malik says something – it is everyones business.

    Malala says something – it is everyones business.

    Politican says something – it is everyones business.

    Reason give: youth will be influenced by them. If people at the top dont shape up how will things change, etc etc.

    Shahid Afridi says something – personal matter.Recommend

  • Needroos

    Veena Malik says something – it is everyones business.

    Malala says something – it is everyones business.

    Politican says something – it is everyones business.

    Reason give: youth will be influenced by them. If people at the top dont shape up how will things change, etc etc.

    Shahid Afridi says something – personal matter.Recommend

  • AWoman

    What he said was not wrong either, I wonder why non Pakistanis are making such a deal out of it.Recommend

  • Pakistani Munda

    Agreed. This shows the world a negative image of Pakistan that we are opressing our women.Recommend

  • knock knock

    ever heard this…”with great power comes great responsibility”… how about it if ur great quaid said the same….Recommend

  • Hanif

    This is his personal opinion and it should be respected,from the sort of family and religious background he comes off this is one true opinion.. In islam women are not supposed to be the point of amusement and joy for a Na-Mehram.. His view is conformed to islamic teachings.Recommend

  • anushe

    If Afridi goes on air voicing his opinions, then he is putting himself out out there to be criticised. What saddens me is that women like yourself justify his conservative views by putting others down.Recommend

  • ovais

    There is nothing wrong with that abotu 70 percent pakistani males thing women should be house wives. there is nothing wrong with that at all. Its the fact that the media criticizes this personal choice of the whole family. there are people who want to remain at home due to religious belief let them. Maybe not all of them are oppressed.Recommend

  • Maida

    Im in shock that the author has studied Gender & Media Studies at LSE and is saying that ‘the argument, that as a celebrity, Afridi will influence young minds to follow his opinions does not hold any merit.’ Sigh. Recommend

  • Reddy

    WTH,why did the interviewer ask the question in the fist place…just to see how many words afridi can muster in a given time???..or thought his opinion matters in a sensitive issuses such as child marriage ,women empowerment in a society which is constantly lurking into the abyssRecommend

  • Shaheera Jalil Albasit

    If this is coming despite your LSE Gender studies Farwa Zahra,I am stunned.Recommend

  • Pathanay Khan

    Thats the problem with people who get this whole “right to opinion” business totally wrong. You have the right to express your opinion, but then be prepared to receive opinions on your opinion. If someone has sexist views then why are we or him concerned when people call him sexist? Stand up to your opinion or change your opinion, there is no concept of “leaving-an-opinion-alone”.Recommend

  • AK

    If its no one’s business then why the hell author is discussing it here in this article. …Recommend

  • Muneeb

    Well i think being a public figure,Afridi should have talk rational. Conservative thinking….Recommend

  • faraz

    Dear tolerance doesn’t mean you don’t criticize/contest other’s views. Nobody has put a tape on his mouth after this statementRecommend

  • unbelievable

    In democracy, everybody is entitled to have his opinion and say it out loud if he wants to. Being politically correct is hypocrisy. And yes, it IS our business if he thinks women belong in the kitchen because we pay money to watch his games. The writer should be in the kitchen and not writing blogs if you ask Afridi!!Recommend

  • Javed Afridi

    An appropriate question, the ET should have asked, would have been: Can Afridi have an opinion of his own, even if its politically incorrect?Recommend

  • Noman Ansari

    Hain? So when Hitler was gassing Jews it was his opinion? Why can’t people have an opinion on someone’s opinion? Also, did you also hear what Afridi had to say about Taliban?

    Outraged that someone is outraged about someone’s opinion is outrageous. I call this outragception.Recommend

  • Saz

    His opinions matter because many many young boys look up to him. As to if he wants a boy or not that is really not any ones busness.Recommend

  • deep

    I think he was being very graceful by not getting into a subject where he obviously has very outdated views – his own wife is completely covered barring her eyes – his daughters will no doubt follow suit – let the guy be and enjoy his batting.Recommend

  • Parvez

    Being a public figure if he ventures an opinion on a loaded question, then a public response is inevitable. Having said that, I maintain that he has the right to his point of view, just as anyone else.Recommend

  • S

    1). Well, if he is entitled to his opinions, I am entitled to dislike him because of his opinions. It matters to me that the public figures I support take the morally correct stance on political issues. 2). Would your reaction have been the same if the topic was not gender but nationalism or religion? What if he had said that Pakistanis are worse athletes than people from other countries? Or said that Muslims where not good cricketers? I doubt people would then just respect this opinions. It’s easy to stomach his comments because they were targeted at women.Recommend

  • Shanze Khan

    Tolerating intolerance in the name of “right to an opinion” is more than a bit ridiculous. Public figure or not, hero or not, any man with an opinion that runs counter to basic human rights of equality is worthy of being condemned for such statements. Having studied gender and media, it is so unfortunate that the author has not embraced gender equality herself. The neutrality the author claims to espouse seems more like intellectual cowardice to me. You should be able to take a stand and engage with issues critically.Recommend

  • Momin Malik

    “Every man has a right to utter what he thinks truth, and every other man has a right to knock him down for it.”
    – Samuel JohnsonRecommend

  • Muhammad Zakariya Al-Razi

    Sure he has the right to hold sexist views. Just like people have the right to call him out on those views. Are you really telling us we should stop criticizing sexists and bigots?Recommend

  • Hasan Zaidi

    Farwa, with all due respect, by that token, you telling us what is and isn’t our business is none of your business. It is certainly our business to prevent Pakistan’s slide into backwardness. A perverse attitude towards women – aired publicly through mass media, by a national figure no less – hurts the country. It is the sort of nonsense that leads to the mindset of dominating and attempting to control women. And yes, when I said wrong, I was not voicing my opinion. I was making an absolute moral statement, because in this case, that’s exactly what it is. There is indeed a wrong and a right and not mere subjective opinion. Trying to justify or argue for limits on the rights of women is WRONG. They are 100% human and should have 100% the right to do whatever men are allowed to do.Recommend

  • saads

    Then dont get outraged when someone gives a personal opinion. on racism. And homophobia. Just because he can swing a bat does not exonerate him from being a jerk publicly. Recommend

  • Faraz Talat

    Did I just read a piece defending a cricketer’s right to be sexist?

    I don’t care if he’s the best cricketer in this galaxy cluster. His cricket skills don’t make it okay for him to say dumb things about women. He’s a man Pakistani youth look up to, and he does have a responsibility to act like a semi-decent person.Recommend

  • zenub

    I agree with lala..though I’m a femenist and a working woman…its always better to sit at home and b taken care of..his emotions could b as a protective man..nothing wrong with his stance!Recommend

  • Farooq Ahmed

    attempt by author to justify such a pathatic statement by misogynist afridi. Recommend

  • Mustafa Nazir Ahmad

    Very well said Ajay. The writer seems to believe in the same but for others only, not herself. Recommend

  • http://www.waqarhussain.net/blog/ Syed Waqar Hussain

    Just for a while, keep #Afridi and his #opinion aside and think that, what #Allah and #Mohammad (pbuh) says about this specific issue? We will get our answers, In Shaa Allah. :-)Recommend

  • Syed Mubeen Hussain Sabzwari

    That’s his views, you and me can’t help it!Recommend

  • Zinc

    I think we as a nation are used to seeing the politicians, artists and even sportsmen lying to us….we cant handle honesty…..plus whats so evil about his opinion…Recommend

  • Spock

    May be afridi should go back to his roots. Well hopefully my opinion wont affect anyone. Generalizing and stereotyping seems to be right now a days.

    Recommend

  • Atif

    Afridi did not blurt it out that he ‘prefers’ women to stay at home. He was forced this question. I would rather have him speak what he believes is true than speaking what the world believes is right. We expect all celebrities to give politically correct answers yet make a mockery out of them when they lie. Way to go Afridi, bring home the World cup as a gift to your princesses.Recommend

  • Atif

    Afridi did not blurt it out that he ‘prefers’ women to stay at home. He was forced this question. I would rather have him speak what he believes is true than speaking what the world believes is right. We expect all celebrities to give politically correct answers yet make a mockery out of them when they lie. Way to go Afridi, bring home the World cup as a gift to your princesses.Recommend

  • Hammurabi

    Our cricketers are highly talented but are less educated.Many a time they suffer defeat due to their lack of vision and stereotyped approach.Foreign exposure has not changed their outlook about life which is also true of many Pakistanis living abroad.Recommend

  • Talha

    You don’t know anything about pakistani women ajay. Recommend

  • Sab33N

    Guys, I understand that his comments about women are demeaning and sexist. But lets not forget, its Afridi who we are talking about. The guy who chewed the ball? He is a pathan who is from a very very conservative background and someone who despite having a star like status, got married at 17 or 18. What else can you expect from him?

    That said, I am a huge fan of this man. Fan of his brilliance in the cricketing ground. Fan of his patriotism. True that he could have not said what he said but we are talking about a man who went to India and then told them that their hearts are not big enough.. the guy just does not know how to be diplomatic and he will always be like that.

    He is an idiot. An idiot who we all love dearly. Sure he has his flaws as quite apparent as this one .. but at least he is honest. He does not pretend to be someone he is not. . Its Afridi, so every time he opens his mouth and says something controversial, I would just read about it, sigh and move on, you guys should too!Recommend

  • Nobody

    Yes, that’s what apologists always tell themselves to feel better about treating women like cattle poop.Recommend

  • -SHAGY-

    On one hand I agree with you to an extent…that its his opinion…and that maybe the women in his home do not have to work and he makes enough money to provide for them. However, he is also a role model for many and they will not understand that this is just his personal opinion rather they will think that’s the way all Pakistani and particularly Muslims should be like that; not allow women to work. Hence the whole world gets more proof how much Muslim women in Pakistan are oppressed!

    Dear Writer, I also live in Qatar and people are often surprised here when I tell them that I am from Pakistan and they ask me that doesn’t your father force you to cover your head? we thought Pakistani women do not work or wear western clothes. How come you were “allowed” to get a labret piercing? so in short being a Pakistani means I do not have a mind of my own and I will be a puppet at the hands of my male family members.Recommend

  • Nobody

    It is wrong when the women in the lives of those 70% of men who feel that way do NOT feel that way themselves. It is not for men to decide where women belong. Having an opinion is one thing; expecting women to fall at your feet or agree with it is a problem.Recommend

  • Fawwad

    lol at “For me, the argument that, as a celebrity, Afridi will influence young minds to follow his opinions does not hold any merit.”….How does that NOT hold any merit? He is a public figure..probably the most popular person in the entire country and each and every word that comes out of his mouth influences people in more ways that can be imagined! Why do you think top models and celebrities are used for selling out brands? People do care what public figures say and do and it portrays the image of their country as well. Come on! I dont know why you spent so much time writing a blog with a flawed argumentRecommend

  • https://www.facebook.com/shail.arora.589 Shail Arora

    “A public figure needs to b politically correct in public, whatever his views may b in pvt.”
    err… isn’t this like being a hypocrite (if the views are contradictory)? In my opinion, it’s better to just say what you believe in rather than be politically correct, because it’s not sustainable. Some way or the other, ones’ actions would just contradict the words.Recommend

  • Supriya Arcot

    He is not a politician . He

    need not to worry about the popular vote while voicing his opinion.Recommend

  • Nobody

    It’s not better to sit at home and be dependent on someone else or sit at home because someone else tells you that you belong at home. It is an attempt to veil sexism while trying to seem protective. That is the mantra of so many Muslim men.
    He’s entitled to his opinion, as are you, but his stance is going to influence many young boys and girls and to think otherwise is naive.
    Cheers.Recommend

  • Yunus

    Dear Ms. Zahra,

    Pakistan is not Qatar, and I would prefer not to live to see the day where it becomes Qatar. In democracies like Pakistan, women are afforded – not as perfectly as one would like – certain rights, freedoms, and dignities.

    One of the dignities afforded to women in Pakistan by segments of our society is that we ostracise and condemn misogynistic tripe when its aired in the public sphere as an example to others. This serves as a counter-balance to the bigotry usually aired on tv (e.g. famous cricket stars condemning their female counter-parts to the kitchen).

    Please however feel free to continue flaunting your own gender-loathing in Doha, where it will no doubt be more welcome.
    Recommend

  • Junaid

    lol so this public figure must lie….like all your incredibly talented politicians?

    don’t vote for him (Afridi) because that might create more women in the kitchen, but it’s absolutely baseless to bash him for having a personal opinion (on anything, including religion or the so many other things you, mr. Ajay, may have a person opinion on)Recommend

  • Hammurabi

    Women are now active in pursuing there rights in Pakistan.The tribal areas where Afridi belongs has a slow progress in this aspect.Tribals want more sons and are against women coming out of their homes.But still the trends are changing slowly.towards betterment.Recommend

  • Ali

    We need to come out of this typical ‘what the world would think’ mindset and respect opinions!Recommend

  • Zohaib

    People Roar about Women in Kitchen
    statement, But no one Roar women on Ramp floor, No one Roar women as dancer in parliament,Recommend

  • Somone

    Are you kidding me. He’s supposed to be a public figure.. on one level he is heard, but on another level he is representative of society too. By criticizing Afridi you are also calling out society. More importantly, by NOT criticizing you are ‘legitimizing’ ‘his opinion’ whether it is currently mainstream or not in society.Recommend

  • Faraz Talat

    Yes, but then she went to Qatar.

    Qatar.Recommend

  • Abdullah

    Freedom of speech people. Everyone is entitled to their own opinions, even if we disagree with them. Besides, his point was that women in Peshawar should stay at home and cook, he did not mean the entirety of women in Pakistan. Taking a little thing and blowing it out of proportion. Our people and media have so much free time these days.Recommend

  • peace_lover

    He has a right to voice his opinion but when he does a multi million Pepsi add with Sana Mir (Pakistan’s Women team’s captian) he comes across as a total hypocrite. Recommend

  • Skeptical

    You mean to say he should act hypocrite in public? He said what his opinion is…..that’s it!Recommend

  • Bano Aubergine

    If you are putting your “personal opinion” out there in the media then yes, you are giving people the right to discuss it. As for his job is to play cricket, his job is also to use his appeal and premise to encourage sports for women , especially given the sexist region he comes from. So yes, his opinion when said in the public sphere matters a lot, especially when there are people listening.Recommend

  • Bano Aubergine

    How about removing the Comments section from this blog, after all, its YOUR personal opinion and who are we the readers to have thoughts about it?Recommend

  • shah

    Thumbs up..Recommend

  • Sir Ahmed

    I think the man is entitled to his own opinion and there is nothing wrong in expressing it as he sees fit. He is affiliated with a religious Jamma’t and he principally believes that women are the queens of our homes and families and perhaps may utilize their efforts there. An opinion I personally share. Had it been a question like “Should a woman be allowed to work and support her husband?” would fall under a total different category.Recommend

  • Faraz Talat

    He has a right to his opinions, but then I have a right to call him a misogynist and an atrocious role model for our children.

    And I intend to zestfully exercise that right.Recommend

  • Saquib Baqai

    What’s wrong with stating his opinion on a subject? i am sure the very same critics would had been posting all praises if he had said he supports women to be out there working side by side with men because that’s what they wanted to hear, its also called “not respecting someone’s opinions”Recommend

  • Sir Tweet

    So if I ask my lady to help me in kitchen then I’m dumb, so what exactly makes me a super intelligent guy? You are not expecting Afridi to support Mathira, are you? Maybe everyone should act like Meera, everyone wins. Nae?Recommend

  • https://www.facebook.com/Mishwanii Noman

    Sorry my vote was actually in No, but mistakenly it goes on yes… we should respect everyone’s self perception. we don’t know about someone’s thought about any issue. so before starting criticism..it’s our duty to go till the real story.Recommend

  • Saba Khattak

    Am sorry, but I disagree with the writer’s take on being influenced by personal upbringing rather than media oriented inclinations. Show me one child who is not affected by the media today one way or the other, unless you are living in a cave in stone age. I fought to be a professional by watching other women succeed around me. My upbringing was very much in sync with Mr. Afridi. So am sure of that many young minds are influenced and affected by such remarks which are not not well thought over… Any public figure is accountable when they express their ‘personal opinions’ PUBLICLY!!! It would’ve been less offensive if he added ‘its just my personal opinion again that I prefer women to stay domesticated. But am not against women making their mark in any field of their choice’. But probably it could’ve killed him to think THAT far, n that too, rationally, eh??Recommend

  • MAC

    I wonder what author would say about movies which promote hate speech against Muslims? Is that also justified because it is the filmmakers’ opinion? It is unfortunate that despite studying at a prestigious insitution, she has yet to understand the difference between airing ones opinion and promoting discrimination.Recommend

  • Muhammad Ahmad

    I enjoyed reading that. Echoes my sentiments exactly. People seriously need to be more tolerant towards other people’s opinions. He’s not asking anyone to disband the women’s cricket team, he’s not an active hindrance, he’s just someone whose ideas about right and wrong differ from our own.Recommend

  • abhi

    Afridi is great, true representative of Pakistan!Recommend

  • Shenaniganman

    Isn’t calling Shahid Afridi a douche for his statement also everyone’s personal opinion? Recommend

  • prashant awasthi

    In democracies like Pakistan…….LOLRecommend

  • gp65

    Was your comment directed to the author or @Ajay gupta?Recommend

  • gp65

    I disagree with the author but comparison to Hitler is quite misplaced. Hitler actually killed people. Afridi is not issuing fatwas against women who do not behave as he wishes. SO he has a right to his opinion.
    Where I disagree with the author however is when she says that Afridi’s opinion is no one’s concern. Wrong. Just as he has a right to his opinion – others have a right to their opinion and criticize him for that – that is fine as well.Recommend

  • gp65

    IT is his personal opinion and he has a right to it. However when he chooses to make his personal opinion public, others have a right to criticize him if they disagree with him.
    The premise of this article (which you seem to support) that Afridi is entitled to freedom of sppech and no one else is. Wrong. Afridi has freedom of speech and so do others.Recommend

  • gp65

    Ah – so when negotiating multimillion dollars worth of advertising contracts you tout the influence you have on people’s choices and then when people call you out on your misogynistic statements suddenly – people should not do so because after all your words have no influence on others. Amazing logic.Recommend

  • gp65

    As always, you expressed the heart of the issue succintly, clearly, and with your trademark calmness.
    Totally agree with you. Couldn’t have put it better than you. Afridi has a right to his opinion. Others have a right to react to his opinion.Recommend

  • gp65

    Absolutely. He can have a personal opinoin – even if it is politically incorrect. If he chooses to express it pubicly, people have a right to criticize him for it.Recommend

  • Fly

    Are you implying that in Islam men are supposed to be the point of amusement and joy for Na-Mehram women. If it is not OK for men to watch women play cricket, then by what logic is it OK for women to watch men playing cricket.Recommend

  • Durran Amin

    We’re not, or at least I’m not, saying he has any obligation to cater to my opinions or worldview.
    ‘People are entitled to their opinions’ is the only defense that defeats itself; if my opinion is that your opinion is crap, you are bound to respect that by your own philosophy. I’m not demanding an apology, I’m not asking he pretend to believe something he doesn’t, but if his opinion won’t affect my life, then mine certainly won’t affect his; stupid words came out of his mouth to imply a stupid idea that is stupid. We can live in a world where Shahid Afridi is sexist on TV, and we can also live in a world where I call him a moron for that, because neither of those things are fatal, and both of those things are true. In my personal opinion.Recommend

  • WookieBrown

    Being a feminist, through and through, I can’t demand anyone to respect my views in Pakistan simply because I hold such views. Afridi is a person before he is a cricketer. If you like free speech, then he is allowed to voice his opinion just like you are entitled to yours. If you have to impose your views, then you have lost.Recommend

  • WookieBrown

    I’m sure the children would be all ears.Recommend

  • WookieBrown

    Faraz, why do you feel the need to personally attack those who disagree with you? That’s not a healthy behavior.Recommend

  • Malaika Harris

    I love Afridi, but come on, what he said was totally irresponsible. He’s one of the few people who has a voice, and is looked upon favorably by millions of Pakistanis. With fans and influence comes responsibility too. His words just strengthened the patriarchal and anti-women tendencies in our society.Recommend

  • abubakar

    Women are indeed oppressed in pakistan, that’s not a negative image but a realityRecommend

  • abubakar

    Pakistan is not America/Europe either, pakistan is the second worst country in terms of gender equality (source dawn). And what certain rights and freedoms you are talking about ha? A country where a person like salman taseer gets killed, ahmadi community is outcasted and prosecuted, christian colonies are burned down, acid thrown on women’s faces is a pretty regular occurrence, there exists no freedom, rights or dignities in such a country. Jeez when will you people snap out of these delusions and state of denials. Recommend

  • abubakar

    Qatar is still better off than pakistan, pakistan is the second worst country in terms of gender equality. Recommend

  • abubakar

    His comments reflect not just his opinion but a whole mindset of atleast 50% of our societyRecommend

  • raj

    Its the responsibility of not only Shahid afridi but other stars in Pakistan who really don’t know what they say on media. All they do is to show how immature they are. Afridi being a father should know that he has daughters and if he is going by his own theory, then he should ask his daughters to stay at home and work on cooking skills rather than going to schools. Now after a while, he will come out and will say my point has been misconstrued :PRecommend

  • raj

    It is freedom of speech but star has to know his responsibility and millions of people follow them. What if a guy who is following him blindly starts to go with this theory that women should be at home and cook ??Recommend

  • raj

    its not about vote. its about the people who might be following this dumbo blindly and starts to belief what he says.Recommend