If she can walk around in skin-tight clothes, why can’t I wear my veil?

Published: May 31, 2014
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In opposition to oppression, I feel a wonderful sense of freedom in my hijab. I feel protected and sheltered. PHOTO: AFP

Many people believe that the Islamic veil represents extremism, that it is a symbol of oppressing women. In April 2011, we saw France becoming the first European nation to ban the wearing of the veil in public. Several other countries, like Germany, Italy and Belgium among others, took inspiration from France and passed legislations banning the ‘hijab’. The irony is that even in the so-called Islamic Republic of Pakistan, a few schools forbid the wearing of the veil.

Ayman Mobin, a straight A’s student in O/A Levels and now a medicine student at Dow Medical College recalled,

“The director of Karachi Grammar School insisted I abandon my veil if I wanted admission there. Apparently, it was against their policy.”

The extremism concept works both ways. To be against the veil is one thing but to actually ban it and forcibly prohibit Muslim women from wearing it is the secular extreme. The veil is a religious issue, and hence, a highly personal one. To prevent women from wearing the veil is patriarchal dictatorship at its worst. The NGOs and feminists demand freedom and independence for women from their society. They argue that complete liberation of women will be only achieved when women will be allowed to do as they please. However, these organisations are strangely silent on the veil issue. This is inexplicable.

If a woman is allowed to saunter along the Karachi beach in skin-fitted Capri pants and shirt, a woman should be at complete liberty to walk the same length of a beach in the hijab. After all, in the industrialised pre-modern society we inhabit, the individual choice culture is prioritised. Insofar as the action of the person is not destructive to the social order and stability of the society, the person in question should be allowed to carry out the action he or she desires. It is true that in official, government-run places, like the court, NADRA or passport office, check-posts, prison or hospital, an identity check is imperative. In such cases, the veil-wearing women are perfectly willing to cooperate. They will show their faces if and when required.

Our reasons for wanting to cover our faces are very straightforward and simple. Firstly, it is the way we interpret a particular verse of the Holy Quran which tells women not to publically display their beauty or adornment (24:30). There are various interpretations offered for this verse and it is a basic human right to be allowed to follow one’s own religious leader’s interpretation, as long as the belief is not detrimental to the social security.

Some argue that the verse does not mention the covering of the face whereas some argue it does as the verse includes the word ‘zeenat’, which simply means beauty. And because one’s face goes a long way in determining how beautiful and attractive one is, women feel obliged to hide it as per the command in the Holy Quran.

I believe the veil maintains the social order of the society. Amina Ahmed, a trainee journalist in the UK, published an article in the Guardian titled, ‘My Niqab is my Identity’, where she refers to this conception as,

“A verse in the Quran tells us to cover our beauty and lower our gaze and to be modest so that we are not taken advantage of – and so that there are no out-of-marriage relationships, unwanted pregnancies and a society where children do not know who their father or mother is. It is not to oppress us, rather give us the privacy and respect we deserve.”

In opposition to oppression, I feel a wonderful sense of freedom in my hijab. I feel protected and sheltered. It gives me the privacy I desire and yearn for. Being a Muslim woman, it is part of my identity and it defines who I am. To have others dictate my mode of dressing by banning the veil only shows how rigid and inflexible people with power and authority can sometimes get.

It is my choice, it wasn’t enforced upon me. I admit there might be women out there who were forced into wearing the veil. But I’m not one of them and there are several other women like me. By banning the veil, the pattern of coercion actually just continues. Women who did not want to wear the veil were forced to wear it because they were probably ordered by the domineering men of their families. And, consequently, if banned, women who originally wanted to wear the veil would be prohibited from wearing it, forbidden to do so by the ruling state.

Either way, both scenarios boil down to compulsion and that is an ugly word in this era. Banning should not even be an option. I believe it is high time for people to dump their bias and prejudice towards what is simply a matter of one’s own choice.

Sara Pirazada

Sara Pirzada

A BBA student at IBA. She tweets as @PirzadaSara (twitter.com/PirzadaSara).

The views expressed by the writer and the reader comments do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of The Express Tribune.

  • Umar

    Excellent article on the double standards prevalent in society. If skin-tight/skin-revealing clothes are acceptable, so should a burqa be. If a burqa is acceptable, so should other forms of clothing be. These are personal choices. In fact, one can argue that a burqa discourages sexual advances, etc.Recommend

  • Mehdi

    Security point of view : how would I identify you as a teacher from a group of students. You can be somebody else behind the cloak. Recommend

  • Mehdi

    Muslim women who choose to veil themselves using Islam as a justification are following strain of Islam which is almost universally associated with extremism. I am a Muslim, I will not provide you a job no matter what your qualifications are because of your veil. My reason is simple I need to communicate with people having eye contact. Hijab is ok to me if it is tucked securely.Recommend

  • Ammar

    Very nicely written, with a balanced opinion.Recommend

  • نائلہ

    *Grabs popcorn and waits for haters to arrive*

    Great blog by the way. Wearing a veil is a personal choice, just as it is a personal choice to prefer chicken pizza over vegetarian.

    Yes I am hungry.Recommend

  • Alsahdiq

    You have made a very valid point Sara. You have every right to be free to wear whatever you like which is not immodest.Recommend

  • Abdul Qadoos

    Why would an orthodox religious veiled woman want to study in modern english grammar school? Why not join a madrassa?Recommend

  • Abdul Qadoos

    Why would an orthodox religious veiled woman want to study in modern english grammar school? Why not join a madrassa?Recommend

  • J T

    There’s a strong sense of the “Stockholm Syndrome” in the author’s argument.Recommend

  • J T

    There’s a strong sense of the “Stockholm Syndrome” in the author’s argument.Recommend

  • Iftikhar Ali

    I have no objections, go ahead, cover your face, and then rock the worldRecommend

  • Kickboxer

    “If she can walk around in skin-tight clothes, why can’t I wear my veil?”

    Simple, a full or partial face veil concerns safety issues and prevents identification, skin-tight clothes do not.
    I have nothing against women with a headscarf and loose clothes, as do most people.
    All other arguments are irrelevant. Public safety and meaningful human interaction should prevail over religious entitlement, when the latter undermines the former.
    The counter-argument that Sara uses about lifting your veil up when identification is required is very weak. A wanted terrorist wearing a burqa who blows himself up, what will identification after the fact do? A child molester who abuses a child and escapes in a burqa is certainly not going to smile in front of a camera, before he assaults a child. When you hide your visual identity, security cameras and ATM cameras become useless.
    Of course none of the these arguments can be applied to Pakistan, the society is deeply religious and conservative, hence no one would argue to ban the burqa or niqaab. The European countries that have either banned or severely restricted the full-face veil are open societies, where preferential treatment based on a certain religion is minimized. So I think, the victim-hood mentality is totally misplaced here.

    Nobody in his right mind in Pakistan would advocate to ban the face veil.

    The banning by some schools in Pakistan seems justifiable, because you need to know who is who in your class, or who is taking an exam. With the burqa that is harder to determine and cheating is much easier!Recommend

  • umair

    totally agree. I am a man and you have put solid and logical arguments (which I already knew of).Recommend

  • MHZ

    I think this is a pretty valid argument.
    True liberty is when anyone can wear whatever they want and this is what liberalism demands from us in its true sense.Recommend

  • Kiran akhtar

    Regally good article Sara. It’s high time someone represented the positive aspects of wearing a hijab and even that out of one’s own free will.
    Love the research and the references you used. Really inspiring piece.
    You go girl.Recommend

  • Hasan

    Indeed. I respect your choice. You can wear whatever you want to. I would also like to bring to your attention that in Iran you are not allowed to leave your house without wearing a hijab. In the spirit of equality and personal choice, I would like to advance the idea that forcing women to wear hijab should also come under criticism.

    The point is that everyone ought to be allowed to make personal choices and not be forced to act in a particular way as long as they cause no harm to anyone else.Recommend

  • Alpha

    Point taken. My experience has been that both extremes face discrimination. There are schools where hijab is enforced and in others it is not allowed. All Pakistani organizations encourage decent clothing and both extremes are discouraged. Covering the face completely causes communication issues both in educational institutions and at work place. My experience In a multinational organization has been that hijab was absolutely no issue. But female employees were strictly forbidden from wearing western clothes of the revealing variety. Wearing a hijab or a full veil to make a statement and to make other people feel less of a muslim becomes objectionable.Recommend

  • Parvaaz

    Very well written. 110% agree with you. These governments trying to take over our lives and tell us how to live our lives is the new world freedom. IRONIC, isn’t it?
    Recommend

  • Radial

    You are conflating the hijab and niqab in order to confuse readers. From your photo, it appears you are a niqab-wearer, not merely a hijab-wearer. There is a big difference in that the face is hidden. It is anti-social behavior. I’m a Karachi Grammar School graduate and I’m glad to hear that they don’t believe the niqab is a good fit with their student culture and educational approach. If you want to wear a niqab, you are free to study at a madressa. Recommend

  • Muhammad

    Stockholm syndrome !!!

    It seems the writer is accepting that a woman is a corrupting entity and therefore must be kept hidden. Madam, you are, I am afraid, betraying your own sex.Recommend

  • Pakistani

    We should ban the veil, it’s got nothing to do with Islam or Pakistan.Recommend

  • Pakistani

    We should ban the veil, it’s got nothing to do with Islam or Pakistan.Recommend

  • fappy

    Can you justify living in a democratic un Islamic country from Islamic point of view? I really dont understand why do muslims complain about it? your so called Islamic Arabia doesn’t even grant you visa free visit let alone equal rights and citizenship.Recommend

  • http://www.mmabbasi.com/ Mohammed Abbasi

    I don’t think its an issue of what a woman (or a man) wants to wear its an issue of being forced to wear/not to wear something by others. Everyone should have a choice and freedom period!Recommend

  • Safwan

    “Several other countries, like Germany, Italy and Belgium among others, took inspiration from France and passed legislations banning the ‘hijab’.” No where in Europe the hijab has been banned. At least before writing an article, get your facts right, in the age of Google, it shouldn’t that difficult. France banned the niqab, not the hijab. A decision I totally approve. The niqab is a medievil Arabic cultural costume that has nothing to do with Islam. In your article you don’t distuingish between the two. Yes a women should be free to wear a hijab, and no country is deing her this right, but wearing a niqab, a costume that deprives her of her identity and creates even issues from a security point of view, that’s a different matter.Recommend

  • Kappa

    In the civilized world, there is a dress code for every place and occasion. We are no more living in 7th century when women were treated as only “sexual objects”.Recommend

  • unbelievable

    So using your argument I suppose someone could argue they have the right to wear a bikini anywhere in Pakistan because the women can wear a veil anywhere in Pakistan.

    Veils are an expression of religion and France is a secular country – hence the ban – or that’s the public argument. I suspect the real issue is that the French are tired of immigrants trying to change their culture.Recommend

  • نائلہ

    Haan, shuru ho jao. -.-Recommend

  • Cody

    If she is free to wear whatever she likes than others also have the right to be free to allow her (or do not allow her) in their institution.Recommend

  • Sara

    Madam if you have the right to wear a veil, niqab or burqa etc similarly others have the right not to allow you in their company or institution. You must respect their right as well.Recommend

  • Arsha

    Doesn’t the need to hide your face to feel protected and sheltered say something about either the society you live in or your own insecurities. An individual should be encouraged to face the world cause that makes one stronger. Hiding just fosters more fears.

    By not wearing a nikab you won’t be forced into a relationship. It would still be your own choice. How can you let your moral choices and decisions be dependent upon a piece of cloth.

    I have never see a woman stand as a leader in a corporation, in the world of scientific innovation, etc while hiding her face. People connect much more visually than verbally and people need to see your face to be able to connect with your words.

    Yes what you wear should be your own choice however choice of nikab is either an outcome of indoctrination in a very patriarchal mindset or of deep insecurities, and usually of both…. Which is why people feel so uncomfortable with it.Recommend

  • Ahmed

    What?

    Why would she want to study in a madrassa just because of the kind of her clothes?Recommend

  • Ahmed

    We should ban secular movements. They have nothing to do with Pakistan, Islam . Have a vote on this one and I’ll win.Recommend

  • Ahmed

    Could you please elaborate. It’s easy to shout stuff and go away.Recommend

  • Hasan

    Indeed. I respect your choice. You can wear whatever you want to. I would also like to bring to your attention that in Iran you are not allowed to leave your house without wearing a hijab. In the spirit of equality and personal choice, I would like to advance the idea that forcing women to wear hijab should also come under criticism.

    The point is that everyone ought to be allowed to make personal choices and not be forced to act in a particular way as long as they cause no harm to anyone else.Recommend

  • Babloo

    Why you want to impose your beliefs on others. You must accept others right not to befriend you or not to allow you in their institute for your attire or outfit. Every place has a dress code in the civilized world.Recommend

  • Betty

    Her point is not valid. She should honor others right not to befriend her or not to allow her in their institute for her religious attire. She should respect the dress code and do not try to impose her religious beliefs on others.Recommend

  • SaneVOICE

    The topic actually should have been “If she can walk around in veil, why can’t I wear skin-tight clothes?”Recommend

  • Malti Chaturvedi

    if a woman can wear capri pants along the beach … so??????????? whats such a big deal about that?? yeah maybe in pakistan :pRecommend

  • abhi

    “To prevent women from wearing the veil is patriarchal dictatorship at its worst” Was it a satire?

    After right to wear veil, what is next? Right to end your life.Recommend

  • abhi

    “To prevent women from wearing the veil is patriarchal dictatorship at its worst” Was it a satire?

    After right to wear veil, what is next? Right to end your life.Recommend

  • abhi

    do you think Madrassa is not a good place?Recommend

  • abhi

    do you think Madrassa is not a good place?Recommend

  • nadeem ansari

    Two wrongs do not make a right. This lady picked up sophistry to argue her point. That is a bad basis as such .

    You are right. Dress must suit the weather . Burqa/Hijab is oppressive . This is a settled issue even among Arabs , the inventors of this pretty thing. You must avoid telling women what to wear.Recommend

  • nadeem ansari

    Two wrongs do not make a right. This lady picked up sophistry to argue her point. That is a bad basis as such .

    You are right. Dress must suit the weather . Burqa/Hijab is oppressive . This is a settled issue even among Arabs , the inventors of this pretty thing. You must avoid telling women what to wear.Recommend

  • s

    cannot agree more. the liberals in our country are as extremeRecommend

  • s

    cannot agree more. the liberals in our country are as extremeRecommend

  • http://nazarbaaz.blogspot.com Nazarbaaz

    If a Muslim actress forgets the limits and shows off her skin, the west starts propagating that “Naked Muslim woman” and when another Muslim lady covers herself, it starts another propaganda that “Extremist Muslims woman”. we are not here to please them but our Lord. got it?Recommend

  • http://nazarbaaz.blogspot.com Nazarbaaz

    If a Muslim actress forgets the limits and shows off her skin, the west starts propagating that “Naked Muslim woman” and when another Muslim lady covers herself, it starts another propaganda that “Extremist Muslims woman”. we are not here to please them but our Lord. got it?Recommend

  • Mj

    Would a girl be allowed to wear ‘capri pants’ at a madrassa or a religious building? I think not. It appears that you are more interested in special privileges for yourself instead of actually fighting for the rights of women (and men) to dress as they please.Recommend

  • Mj

    Would a girl be allowed to wear ‘capri pants’ at a madrassa or a religious building? I think not. It appears that you are more interested in special privileges for yourself instead of actually fighting for the rights of women (and men) to dress as they please.Recommend

  • Necromancer

    I would always prefer sunny leone over herRecommend

  • Zeeshan

    Of course, it is her who is facing “Stockhold Syndrome” while enlightened thinkers like you are always thinking.Recommend

  • Zeeshan

    english grammar schools are only for those who want to be english in taste and who agree with Macaulaylism?Recommend

  • Zeeshan

    Let’s expose her body and liberate her from her Stockholm Syndrome, lest she is “betraying [her] own sex”. Let us also liberate her so that she will dress like those women in Stockholm.Recommend

  • Zeeshan

    “I suspect the real issue is that the French are tired of immigrants trying to change their culture.”

    Oh ok, why are Pakistanis not tired of Europeans “trying to change their culture”?Recommend

  • Moiz Omar

    Personally I don’t like veils and I don’t know why people wear them, but i think that the only type of veil that should be prohibited is the one that covers the entire face. That is a security threat. You should be allowed to wear it inside your own home but not in public. Otherwise all other veils should be allowed. That is what I think.Recommend

  • SayNoToVeil

    Yes you will win because of the sad pathetic mindset of the
    Majority of people of our nation. And BTW mullahism has
    Nothing to do with Pakistan too otherwise Jinnah would have
    Setup shariat/mullah courts, mandatory veil for women,
    And jazia for minorities etc soon after Pakistan was born. Go learn your
    History.Recommend

  • Zeeshan

    *her= sheRecommend

  • punjabi

    how would you respond if an institute banned the wearing of crosses by Christian students? wouldn’t that infringe upon their religious freedoms? wouldn’t that be oppression?Recommend

  • punjabi

    yes they have the right to allow her or disallow her but not on the basis of her attire!Recommend

  • J T

    I prefer to leave it at that so wise people such as yourself could ponder over it. :)Recommend

  • Faulitics

    Woman in Stockholm dress very fashionably. They do not follow the arab dress code.Recommend

  • Zeeshan

    “We are no more living in 7th century when women were treated as only “sexual objects”.”

    Have men stopped desiring women in the 21st century and joined en masse to wave the rainbow flag? Or, were the only men could be located in the 7th century when they were honest about sexual desire, untainted by 20th century self-righteous proclamation grounded in no one’s reality?Recommend

  • Hamza

    I don’t see why you have to write this article while living in Pakistan. Here, girls are not forced to take off their Burqa. They are forced to WEAR one
    What about the opposite?. Schools like Generations and Reflections actually FORCE, yes FORCE, their female students to wear the Hijab!
    Schools and colleges like KGS have their dress code and it’s their uniform that has to be worn. They, however, allow female students to wear white color Hijabs if they want to.
    You are clearly confused between a Hijab and a Niqab. Niqab (Burqa) covers your whole body while Hijab only covers the face
    How does a Niqab or Hijab give you protection? If someone wants to sexually assault a woman, they’ll do it regardless of her dress.
    And you have conveniently left out the security issues. What about the suicide bombers who disguise themselves in the Burqa? In 2010, a woman wearing a Burqa blew herself up at a security checkpoint. In Somalia also there was a similar attack in which three cabinet ministers died.
    I’m an officer in the Army and I have fought in FATA for four years. And I remember four soldiers of my unit…..Shayan, Tariq, Mansoor, Zulfiqar….who were killed by a female wearing a burqa.Recommend

  • punjabi

    pfff…Which world do you live in?!?!?
    No society in history has ever treated women more like ‘sexual objects’ than today’s ‘civilized world’…I wonder where you’re living? to sell even a carton of juice you need a sexualized image of a woman, to sell a motorcycle you need to objectify women as purely objects/pieces of meat through which sexual desire can be fulfilled…This aspect of modern society is probably the ugliest and most disgustingRecommend

  • Faulitics

    People seem to forget that religion is a great vehicle for cultural imperialism and it has always been that way. The author is just a victim of this cultural imperialism. For the religious people here, from what i have read, the Koran asks woman to dress modestly. If you want to borrow the pre islamic meaning of “modestly” from arabia instead of deriving the meaning from your own countries history and cultural norms, you are just victims of cultural imperialism. I feel sad for you.Recommend

  • punjabi

    which blog post were you reading??? some imaginary one that is in your head, maybe :PRecommend

  • punjabi

    who said anything about good or bad? it’s all about personal choiceRecommend

  • Faulitics

    Yeah. Lord has a dress code for you and the lord is pleased if you follow his dress code. Its interesting how the mind works or to be more accurate “social engineered” to work.Recommend

  • Sceptic

    Was not Jinnah, the founding father of Pakistan, a secular?Recommend

  • Faulitics

    The author says “I believe the veil maintains the social order of the society”
    So she believes that woman without veils disturb “social order”. This sounds like the reasons given for imposing veils on woman who live in saudi arabia. If some woman themselves help their repressors, what can anyone do?Recommend

  • Anon

    We have went to the moon,figured out some mysteries of the universe but people in this country argue over the same minor things as they did 50 years ago…you need common sense for things like these,not articles.Recommend

  • Faulitics

    Pakistanis obviously are not tired of the arabs already having changed their culture. Sad.Recommend

  • Asm

    Covering the whole face is a security threat. Also it is not required in Islam in fact you cannot even pray or do hajj if your face is covered. Recommend

  • abhi099

    “MY niqab is my identity” Your niqab hides your entity.Recommend

  • Warda

    Its okay to wear a hijab. That should be the personal choice of a woman. It is not okay to wear a niqaab and no one should be allowed to wear a niqab. It has great drawbacks including difficulty of identity and other social problems.

    France has banned niqab, and NOT Hijab. One would expect the writer to know at least that much before embarking on writing a blog on such a sensitive issue

    And also, most of the arguments are a major fail! Trust me, its more difficult to wear a staright jeans (let alone a skin tight capri) in Pakistan than a hijab. what most ppl dislike is niqab (covering of face)Recommend

  • Al Mahound
  • Moiz Omar

    Mr. Jinnah said Pakistan would be a state where religion would play no role in the administration of the country:

    “You are free; you are free to go to your temples, you are free to go to your mosques or to any other place or worship in this State of Pakistan. You may belong to any religion or caste or creed — that has nothing to do with the business of the State.”

    “Now I think we should keep that in front of us as our ideal, and you will find that in course of time Hindus would cease to be Hindus, and Muslims would cease to be Muslims, not in the religious sense, because that is the personal faith of each individual, but in the political sense as citizens of the State.”Recommend

  • Prashant

    Appreciate your thoughts Sara and I agree with you for the most part however your blog would have had much more punch if you had also defended the people who would not like to wear a niqab/hijab but they are being forced to especially in countries like Saudi Arabia. If it is incorrect to ask people not to wear the niqab, it is equally inappropriate for people of other faiths to be wearing the veil under compulsion.Recommend

  • Adpran

    I know personally with few face-veiled women. I can’t see their faces, but i can recognize them from their voices.Recommend

  • Prashant

    Not really mate. If you think she is wrong to wear veil, she might get back and question your choice as well. Let’s agree to disagree even when we are not on the same page.Recommend

  • Prashant

    Ahmed, hitler won the ballot box too..Recommend

  • abdul Khan

    Disgusting articleRecommend

  • Nazia

    Funny two men talking about women when you don’t understand. Tbh I wear hijab and cover my body in Pakistan, wear no makeup when i go out, even cover my face sometimes…but what’s mysoginistic is Zeeshan automatically assumes that women want to become half naked in the name of liberation. I’m sorry but I believe a woman should choose how to dress, yet from the basics both should cover their bodies. Covering hair, face, wearing hat, growing beard whatever it’s your choice from then. If we cover ourselves in veils, were sexual objects if we don’t wear wear veils we’re still sexual objects. I really don’t understand this thinking. But I can actually understand where Al Mahnoud is coming from, it really is your thinking and mentality…I never feel like a sexual object in London if I don’t wear hijab, but I will always feel a sexual object in Pakistan with it on, I’ve been harassed more in pakistan than anywhere fully covered ! So Zeeshan don’t talk about liberation, what is meant to liberate me from the problem really isn’t..Recommend

  • Moiz Omar

    The Europeans have never tried to change our culture as far I can see. But the Arabs have. The Burqa, Niqab have never been part of our culture.Recommend

  • Sara

    I mentioned “face hijab” in my original article, clueless as to why it got changed. And here’s the reference, included that in my article as well, but was removed.
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/18/veil-bans-by-country_n_3949110.html
    Date I viewed the webiste on: 9/25/2013
    Hope this clears things.Recommend

  • PS

    So sad to hear that KGS couldn’t liberate your thinking… which to me, sounds very backward. Everyone should be given the space to wear whatever they like. I don’t think it affects you directly if the person sitting 5 feet away from you wears a niqab. Grow up and let others live!Recommend

  • Observer

    Ms. Sara, Of course you have the right to wear what you want. However, others are correct to think the burka is a throwback to 7th century and a symbol of oppression of women. Indeed, it is a symbol of the 7th century primitive Arab practice of domination over women and their treatment as objects of possession.Recommend

  • Javeria Khan

    Because her religion never restricted her to religious studies only. Islam wants us to live a balanced life. Its only people like you who narrow down their perspectives and divide people on the basis of a madrassah graduate or an english school graduate, when both can be equally practicing Muslims.Recommend

  • Sara

    Reference for the countries mentioned above. Also, please note that my original article specified the “face nikaab” or the “face hijab”. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/18/veil-bans-by-country_n_3949110.html

    Date website was viewed on: 9/25/2013Recommend

  • Pervez

    The answer to your question is quite simple really.

    In a majority of countries where the woman wears a veil, she is forced to do so either through legislation or societal pressure whether it is Saudi Arabia or Iran or a lot of other countries. Hence the issue of “free choice” gets thrown out of the window.Recommend

  • sumair khan

    when you get the job you don’t make commitment to GOD but to fullfill the company, their policy and requirements. if your faith is week and cant handle the exposure of wordly things due to cultural and other pressure then better serve your time in islamic studies or other religious activities because IMO there is simply no place for religion into corporate institutions, public sector. i dont know whats wrong with shalwar kameez that woman have adopted this middle-eastern attire to make religious statement which have destroyed our social culture.Recommend

  • A MADARSAH STUDENT….

    Its actually a clash of civilizations…the new world order, the western civilization has no barrier in its way, no religion, no social system…the only barrier and resistence to them is the Islamic way of life…Both systems are completely opposite to each other,..one calls towards the modesty and “sharam o haya”, the other is the flag holder of nudity and fullfilment of desires..

    Banning the veil, the Azans etc are actually an attempt to hurt the Islamic way of life…it is being planted in our unconcious, through every type of media, that Islamic civilization is indeed inferior to what is coming from the west…in this state of war, we need to hold tight onto our culture and values, and stick ourselves to Quran and sunnah, or otherwise “hamari dastan bhi na hogi dastanon main”….Recommend

  • privali

    Actually muslims throughout the West are facing these problems i know prégnant muslim women in Canadian hospitals been spat upon and doctors giving them à more thorough physical than necessary … Non muslims and their like minded have made it their number one priority to be against islam and muslims. From car to syria muslim women raped and killed are hundreds of thousands but one woman gets more attention then them if her incident maligns islam and muslims Recommend

  • A MADARSAH STUDENT….

    That shows the narrowness of ur mind..get out of the box of discrimination…

    We are not in any way against the modern knowledge..we are against the modern (western) culture that is accompanied with it..

    I myself study in a madarsah along with the professional financial studies in modern institutions…(and i m fully supported by my Madarsah teachers),…the purity and the devotion to education as i see in my Madarsah, the modern institutions (actually the traders under the label of education) are not even anywhere close to it…Recommend

  • Syeda KAzmi

    Haaah.. Somebody wrote this finally…I have been rejected by an advertising agency because they thought women with Hijab (not veil) do not fit in here… However you mentioned about Amna ahmed’s article “and so that there are no out-of-marriage relationships, unwanted pregnancies and a society where children do not know who their father or mother is. It is not to oppress us, rather give us the privacy and respect we deserve.”
    I seriously doubt this… veil doesn’t anyway stop these mentioned things.. even veil is being used in prostitution at large.. Your character and values are determined by the choices you make and not the appearance you carry… Women with veils/hijab should not fall in any sort of delusions of grandeur just because they cover..

    only Allah is the best judge of all..Recommend

  • unbelievable

    What percentage of Pakistan population are Europeans?Recommend

  • Sara

    If Alia Bhatt in Highway can develop it, if Beauty in Beauty & the Beast can, why ever not? *rolling eyes* Dude, matter of choice. Heard the word?Recommend

  • Raza

    Let me name a few famous women who you might know and who don’t cover their faces and yet are/were upright and outstanding citizens. Benazir Bhutto, Ayesha Jalal, Nazia Hassan, Asma Jahangir, Fatima Jinnah, Bilquis Edhi. Could please name a single woman who covers her face and achieved even a fraction of what any of these women have achieved. What do you want to achieve by covering your face? Why do you seek our approval for an abnormal act? What if men started demanding that they be allowed to hide their faces in public. Why do you want to create a demented society?Recommend