Thank you Faf du Plessis for showing us that the ICC cares… about you!

Published: October 28, 2013
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But you, dear Faf, must find yourself very fortunate to not have been ban from any future matches. Apparently that punishment is reserved strictly for our Pakistani players!

Dear Faf du Plessis,

First of all, one must congratulate you for imparting a unique idea of utilising the trouser zip for tampering with the cricket ball. In the past, some ‘enthusiasts’ had tried Pepsi bottle tops, dirt/dust in the pockets, finger nails, and even teeth, but none had used a trouser’s zip before.

Once upon a time in Australia, our Afridi “Lala” had tried to chew and/or bite the ball in frustration after several defeats, but he couldn’t hide it from any of the cameras installed across the ground. As a result, he was fined for two T20 matches. At least, a colourless and transparent zip can still be hidden from half of those cameras. Your efficiency goes far and beyond any previous notable attempts. Well done!

By the way, Faf, what was going on in your mind when this groundbreaking idea popped in to your head?

Your team was in an unassailable position in the Test match. Perhaps, it was the Dubai-heat that got to you or maybe, you just wanted an early break from a boring match, where you couldn’t score any noteworthy runs. After all, in a caldron like the Dubai cricket stadium, one can even fry an egg without a stove!

However, I am still in the process of comprehending the logic behind your act of genius.

Hang on, did you do it because you wanted to give this match some sort of historical significance?

That was definitely the reason, right?

Nevertheless, now you can count yourself in an unparalleled club of some of the best players of the game; Waqar Younis, Shoaib Akhtar, Shahid Afridi, Sachin Tendulkar, and Mike Atherton, who have all been previously accused of tampering with the ball. Finally, do not worry about those five penalty runs consequently docked from your team, since your captain, Graeme Smith, and his deputy, AB De Villiers, scored them aplenty.

But you, dear Faf, must find yourself very fortunate to not have been ban from any future matches. Apparently this punishment is reserved strictly for our Pakistani players, like “Lala” and Akhtar. Akhtar, who was banned for two one-day matches and fined 75 percent of his match fee for tampering during a tri-series in Sri Lanka in 2003, said,

“I am surprised at the decision.”

But I am sure you will not lose any sleep over a 50 percent match fee deduction. Apparently, nobody loses their temper when Faf tampers with the ball. In fact, people, like vice-captain AB De Villiers, defend Faf with a rather naïve statement like,

“Honestly, we’re not the team that scratches the ball.”

After reading this statement, one is compelled to scratch one’s head. Not only me, but umpires Rod Tucker, Ian Gould, ICC match referee, spectators and audience alike were caught scratching their heads. He further added to his statement,

“I know Faffy very well, he’s the last man to try anything like that, it is part of his responsibility to shine the ball and to get it to swing and to look it after, it’s not an easy job, I thought he did it very well.”

How very cute and naïve, for our beloved AB to stand up for his team-mate! I am not sure whether Faf is the “last man” who would try something like that, but he was definitely the first to try his pant zipper and on that note, I agree with you, “he did it very well”.

I am happy that you, AB, are not the captain of your team though, otherwise you may have enacted “the Inzi” by leaving the ground premises and walking away with the team in protest. But that would have meant a possible forfeiture of the match and your team could lose a series against a team that was bowled out for just 99 in its first innings. You wouldn’t do that, now would you?

A rather satisfying fact is that Pakistan is not the only green team that has been associated to such controversies; although had it been our Pakistani green team, the clamour would have been much louder! The other “green team” is also often not far behind. Historically, South Africa has proportionally (if not equally) choked on important cricketing occasions. Similar to their green counterparts, South Africa has also been involved in the worst match-fixing scandals and the recent ball-tampering scandal must serve as another unwanted feather in their green caps.

As I finalise these lines, the Test match has already come to its logical conclusion; Pakistan has lost it by an innings and 92 runs. The series is mutually shared. It was a beautiful Test match and it will be remembered for a phenomenal partnership between AB De Villiers and Graeme Smith, Imran Tahir’s comeback heroics, and Asad Shafique’s excellent rearguard century.

Simultaneously, however, this Test match will also go down in history as the match in which the ball was tampered with a zipper for the first time ever and the day the ICC decided to ‘lenient’ instead of sticking to precedent. So thank you Faf – you gave us a reason other than our loss to remember this match. We are forever grateful.

Faisal Nadeem

Faisal Nadeem

An electrical engineer with a PhD in Computer Engineering, Faisal Nadeem's interests include sports, art, literature, culture and religion.

The views expressed by the writer and the reader comments do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of The Express Tribune.

  • adeel_ahmed85
  • Sane

    Double and racism based decisions always against Pakistan. Others including Indians are always ignored by ICC.Recommend

  • Sppock

    Will that letter be posted at the same time that the PCB ask for the ICC to reduce Amirs punishment.

    So the PCB want the ICC to reduce Amirs ban and increase Faf’s punishment. I suppose the ICC will get a good laugh out of it.

    quoted from another forumRecommend

  • khan

    He should be punished hard for this lolzRecommend

  • Noor

    Dear Writer,
    Although you picked up a very good topic but I think its very naive to think that the whole world is conspiring against us and if this is the case, then why wouldn’t they? They have every right to discriminate against us, if we discriminate amongst ourselves, our very own people… Pakistanis are talented people..but the talent is not only restricted towards sports , it is and should be spread everywhere… ofcourse it has to be in a positive direction too… We dont have to be perfect or subservient to every order BUT yes, We do need to keep working hard inorder to bring back the colors, establish our sovereignty and image.

    I don’t care if the World is or not biased to us, all I care is that we should not be biased with ourselves…reach the heights where WORLD listen to your commands, your voice and obey your laws… then only we can stand up and make claims against what is unjust and what is wrong!

    However,With regards to freedom of speech and expression, u have every right to speak on any issue but please these days even in the ‘negative’ stories, try to reflect our positive side.. We Don’t want people to fret on every issue, We need positivity in our thoughts for the next few years…

    Recommend

  • Sure?

    Did this article have anything to do with Ondia? Why did you drag it in?

    Also which international fixture was an Indian proved doing similar things and let go without any penalty?Recommend

  • M F Nadeem

    Dear Noor

    Thanks for such a detailed feedback!
    I partially agree to your statements in the comment.
    First of all, I am generally very optimistic person, and based on that, I would say that we shouldn’t remain silent on clear cases of such discrimination.
    Secondly, I agree to you that we should first achieve all the said heights that you are referring to, here.
    And, thanks for the advice to be positive. :)
    BRs, FaisalRecommend

  • GUL KHAN

    witty but Brilliant articleRecommend

  • Sane

    What about massive match fixing that Indians do? Indians have done so much that credibility of Cricket is in question now.Recommend

  • ImIDIOT

    What was the point, the author wanted to make ?Recommend