Living with Misophonia

Published: August 22, 2013
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I cannot emphasise on how difficult everyday life can be for people with Misophonia. PHOTO: REUTERS

‘What’s that awful ticking noise?’

‘Who’s tapping their feet on the floor?’

‘Why can’t people eat without making that annoying chomping sound?’

‘You sip your tea, you don’t slurp it.’

‘Make it stop. Make it STOP!’

‘I’ll punch that person so hard. I’ll kill him.’

‘I need to run. Run. Now!’

Too intense for you? Well, this is what a person suffering from Misophonia is thinking nearly all the time. The question arises, but why? And what is this disease?

Misophonia is a neurological disorder, in which a person feels anxiety, and even rage in response to certain sounds, which may be loud or soft, and are very common. It is also termed as Selective Sound Sensitivity Syndrome. The sounds include coughing, sneezing, scratching, breathing, repetitive tapping of a pencil, and a whole lot of others that can be classified as normal, everyday sounds. Neuroscientists have not been able to pinpoint the exact cause of Misophonia, but are of the view that the pathology lies in the connection between the limbic system (set of structures in the brain responsible for emotions and behaviour), and the auditory system (responsible for hearing). However, this being established, there are still a lot of things that are not known about it yet.

Misophonia usually starts in early childhood, and includes a few trigger sounds generated by one or more members of the family. As the person grows older, the limbic system’s response to these triggers becomes stronger, and often the number of triggers increases, accompanied by visual stimuli. For the sufferers, exposure to these sounds for a couple of minutes is equivalent to an hour of nails being scratched on a chalkboard.

They experience severe forms of rage, panic and even disgust, and develop an extremely avoidant behaviour. For them being alone is better than sitting in a social gathering which causes anxiety.

I have had Misophonia since I was a nine-year-old. All of my triggers were limited to home at that time. Growing up with this disorder has not been an easy feat. I’m sure that my family regarded me as somewhat strange, with all the ‘temper tantrums’ I had, which in fact were only a response to the triggers.

Meal times were always the hardest. Every clink of a spoon on a plate seemed like a gunshot to me. If someone spoke to me while eating, I’d lose it. I felt suffocated at the table, and so enraged that I used to go to my room afterwards, and hurl my possessions at the wall or kick things around. Finally, when it all became too much for me to bear, I started taking my meals in my own room and I still do.

Considering the fact that this disorder affects a person’s life to such a degree, the question arises, what is the cure?

Sadly, there is no answer to this question.

As it is still being regarded as a ‘new’ disorder, neuroscientists have yet to come up with a cure, although a little progress has been made in devising ways to cope with the disorder and to prevent the affected people from becoming socially dysfunctional. Many people have come up with their own ways to cope with the disorder, which include using ear plugs, headphones, and echolalia (mimicry) which usually helps decrease distress.

Psychiatrists have recommended two types of therapies: the exposure therapy, in which the patient is exposed to his triggers over a period of time, and the cognitive behaviour therapy, which is problem focused and action oriented. The exposure therapy is believed to make the situation worse rather than being helpful, so most of the psychiatrists today go with the behaviour therapy.

I accidentally found out about Misophonia on the web. If I hadn’t, I’d have spent the rest of my life wondering what’s wrong with me and why I react to certain things in a way that can only be described as ‘unusual’. I was actually a bit relieved to know that there’s a name for all that I’ve experienced since my childhood, that it’s not a figment of my imagination, and most of all, that I can get help regarding this.

Yet, I’d be lying if I said that I went straight to seek it. In fact, a lot of time passed before I could do it. Because, even if it is an actual disorder, how in the world do you explain all of this to anyone without feeling self-conscious about it? Anyway, in the end I had to, because it started getting a lot worse than before and I really couldn’t concentrate on anything. Eventually, I went to a doctor and he referred me to a behavioural therapist.

I cannot emphasise on how difficult everyday life can be for people with Misophonia. The fact that there is no cure or even set coping strategies makes it even harder. It may take decades to understand the disorder better and to devise a cure for it. Right now, however, we’re at the point where so many people have Misophonia without understanding what’s wrong with them because the general public hasn’t even heard of it.

As of now,  most people believe it to be making a big fuss over a tiny problem.

I mean, how frustrated can you get over a little foot-tapping, heavy breathing etc, right?

What’s the big deal if people make a little noise as they eat?

Why should we be more careful or understanding when around such people?

They have anger management issues, that’s all, isn’t it?

This is the common reaction to people who suffer from Misophonia and it is this sort of response that makes our lives so much harder. Because our disorder is not visible, people think a problem doesn’t exist.

We have something much more serious than just a little pet peeve. A person doesn’t have to be physically impaired to be considered ‘not well’. In fact, psychological issues run much deeper, and need to be handled carefully. Having a problem, but not really comprehending what it really is can harm you and this is even more so when the people around you haven’t ever heard about it.

My main reason for writing about Misophonia in such detail is so that everyone who reads this gets to know that such an illness exists, so that if they ever come across a person with Misophonia, perhaps they’ll be less impatient with them and be able to empathise. I

Studies reveal that the occurrence of many psychological disorders in a person suffering from Misophonia is decreased, with one exception that is OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder), which is found in 52.4% of the cases. Since there is a high occurrence of OCD among these patients, there was thought to be a connection between the two. But, there has been no proof of that. I have OCD as well and in my experience it gets worse after an episode of exposure to the triggers. Also, chronic anxiety and multiple phobias are very common in these patients.

Although, people around me found my behaviour a bit irrational at times, ever since I’ve told them what really is the matter most of them have been really supportive. They’re careful around me, so as not to cause a trigger. I’m really grateful because after 11 years, I have finally understood myself. Even if I don’t have the solution to my disorder yet, it’s reassuring to know that I don’t have to hide from them or anyone else anymore.

Reema Asif

Reema Asif

A doctor in the making at KMDC, Reema is a fervent reader, food enthusiast and music lover.

The views expressed by the writer and the reader comments do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of The Express Tribune.

  • bleh

    thank youRecommend

  • Parvez

    Why didn’t I read this many, many years ago.
    The way you explained this and the connection with OCD was definately an educational experience for me. Thank you author ……… and ET as well.
    Recommend

  • JK

    OMG !! so true, and thanks a lot for sharing your’s misophonic experience,it is no doubt difficult living with it and equally hard to explain it to others.God bless usRecommend

  • Moeed Ali

    i have the same issue, but try not to belittle what we go through. this articles does make misophonia understand at a whole new level. But since i m going through it as well, i believe the “little tapping and those noises” are not little rather a nuisance for me.
    the way how i deal with it is, i try to leave the room altogether but most

    i try to counter it by producing one of my own sounds or reaction to it … for example if a person is picking nose infront of me in the same room, i hide the fact that m actually watching that way, i start using my cell. hence the reason why my cell is always with me.

    i could go on with alot of solutions, but i dont think anyone would actually read these comments. do for now this is from my side.Recommend

  • Anon

    Marry a doctor…not many others will understand or put up with you’re issues for decades..Recommend

  • Sufyan

    Good writeup. Now i know why i used to get annoyed by certain sounds. Recommend

  • http://www.sound-rage.com Judith Krauthamer

    Thank you very much for this blog. I recently published “Sound-Rage. A Primer of the Neurobiology and Psychology of a Little Known Anger Disorder.” I believe that the neural circuitry of ‘misophonia’ and OCD are quite different. OCD is considered an anxiety disorder, whereas the key response in misophonia is anger. Anxiety happens as a result of the disorder (people become anxious when they know they will be in a trigger environment, for example).

    Hypervigilance, or being on the lookout for triggers, is common among misophonia, OCD, and post traumatic stress disorder so the disorders are often misdiagnosed by therapists.

    I believe in misophonia that the auditory signals are mid-assessed by the brain in the insular cortical region of the brain, a hub where sensory information, anger, empathy, danger, and pain are processed.

    I hope this adds to the discussion.Recommend

  • Insaan

    Reema Asif: “Meal times were always the hardest. Every clink of a spoon on a plate seemed like a gunshot to me. If someone spoke to me while eating, I’d lose it. I felt suffocated at the table, and so enraged that I used to go to my room afterwards, and hurl my possessions at the wall or kick things around. Finally, when it all became too much for me to bear, I started taking my meals in my own room and I still do.”

    Do you still feel the same way about Meal times?

    Reema Asif: “I’m sure that my family regarded me as somewhat strange, with all the ‘temper tantrums’ I had, which in fact were only a response to the triggers.”

    Did you have temper tantrums without triggers also?Recommend

  • Maryum Tariq

    Hey, can u please tell me what doctor did you go to ?Recommend

  • Umme

    can a marriage workout with someone who has OCD or Misophonia ?Recommend

  • http://tribune.com.pk Umme

    Can a marriage work out with someone who has OCD or misophonia ? Recommend

  • Reema

    @Moeed Ali:
    I know exactly what everything you experience when exposed to the triggers must feel like. Even though we all have our little coping techniques, it is best to seek help regarding that. I know it will not completely ‘cure’ what you and I have, but it’s worth giving a shot, rather than letting all the stress and anxiety build up.Recommend

  • Insaan

    @Sufyan:
    Good writeup. Now i know why i used to get annoyed by certain sounds.

    Are you cured now?
    Many people after reading this article are going to feel they are suffering from Misophonia or suffered from Misophonia. Many symptoms mentioned in the blog can be due to many psychological or stress problems.

    Anxiety is a very common psychological condition and Misophonia is a rare neurological disorder.Recommend

  • mind control

    Wow!

    You have explained the whole thing so well.

    My sympathies to the sufferers. And I resolve to moderate my actions to minimise the triggers around those who suffer from this.Recommend

  • Gratgy

    I accidentally found out about Misophonia on the web. If I hadn’t, I’d have spent the rest of my life wondering what’s wrong with me and why I react to certain things in a way that can only be described as ‘unusual’.

    Go see a doctor, DO NOT SELF DIAGNOSE by going on the internet. You might actually be suffering from Cyberchondria instead

    Cyberchondria (or cyberchondriasis) is the unfounded escalation of concerns about common symptomology based on review of search results and literature online. Articles in popular media position cyberchondria anywhere from temporary neurotic excess to adjunct hypochondria. Cyberchondria is a growing concern among many healthcare practitioners as patients can now research any and all symptoms of a rare disease, illness or condition, and manifest a state of medical anxiety.

    Also its so strange that there is an almost identical article in the “Opinion” section with subtle differences. This looks like version 2.0 Recommend

  • Samir Tariq

    Very well written and explained in a very simple yet effective mannerRecommend

  • Reema

    @Gratgy:
    If you had read a little further, you would have known that I did see a doctor. And he apparently did not think that I have ‘Cyberchondria’. And neither does my behavioral therapist. Anyway, thank you for sharing this bit about Cyberchondria.Recommend

  • Insaan

    The exposure therapy is believed to make the situation worse rather than being helpful, so most of the psychiatrists today go with the behaviour therapy.

    How can a behavior therapy fix a neurological disorder? Behavior therapy can fix psychological problems only. Recommend

  • Eliya Raza

    @Gratgy
    You should have read the article thoroughly. She has explained it quite clearly that she has “seen” a doctor. Personally, I think it’s a VERY brave and commendable thing that she has done. She has publicly, openly admitted that she’s going to a Behavioral Therapist, she has openly admitted her deepest, darkest fears, despite knowing that people like You exist in our society. Who frown upon these matters as if they are taboo and try to seek attention by being nasty. It would be better if You had taken a little time to appreciate THAT rather than focus on the things YOU thought were wrong about the article. Recommend

  • Adah

    @Gratgy:
    and Anon too
    Please respect this writer and be proud that someone has the guts to come out to educate the public and help others who suffer from this disorder. If you had it you’d know the relief when you finally find out what is wrong.

    Thank you Reema. Thank you very much for this well-written piece.

    Hope to see you around on the websites!Recommend

  • Anon

    @Adah

    Why are you aggressive about nothing…there is nothing remotely disrespectful about my comment .Is the world full of understanding,wonderful men who’ll put up with such complications for 50 years ?
    I myself have several health problems and I think a lay person wouldn’t have adjusted and been as understanding with me, as my husband who is a surgeon.
    Go find someone else to taunt and criticize with your displaced anger.Recommend

  • http://www.misophonia-association.org Marsha Johnson

    I find such truth in your words. What I could add is that my surveys and data over 16 years show that less than 20% of those with this disorder have been diagnosed with OCD.

    So I believe it to be less than you have stated. I suspect this is a kind of variant of OCD, however, and would add there are several choices for managing the problems:

    1) sound therapies including acoustic therapies like Misophonia Management Protocol

    2) pharmaceutical aids for secondary symptoms, some have found mild doses of anti anxiety meds very helpful

    3) psychological counseling particularly CBT, DBT, behavioral therapy, mindfulness based stress reduction, etc. Exposure theraoy has been shown to be helpful to date.

    Marsha Johnson, AuDRecommend

  • http://www.sound-rage.com Judith Krauthamer

    Two quick comments. “Misophonia” and OCD are two discrete disorders. The two disorders may be co-morbid (two different disorders that have a high liklihood of occurring together, like the co-morbidity of ODD and ADHD). 20% have been diagnosed with OCD perhaps becuase 1) most therapists do not even know of the existence of “misohonia” and, more likely 2) hypervigilance, the constant lookout for triggers, is common among OCD, post traumatic stress disorder, and “misophonia.” Therapists note the hypervigilance and assume instrusive thoughts, and thus the incorrect diagnosis. Finally, OCD is classified as an anxiety disorder, although misophonia fulfills none of the requirements in the DSM-V for anxiety disorder.

    And, to respond to how behavior therapy and a neurological disorder are related: a neurological disorder is a dysfunctionally firing (i.e., assessment) of a stimuli. Here, the brain mis- assesses an auditory stimuli. There is a neural pathway that the misophonic brain follows upon hearing a gum pop ( in the sub-cortical regions of the limbic system, the insular cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex). Behavior therapy attempts to teach the brain new thoughts and associations with the sound. It does NOT change the dysfunctional neural pathway. However, it strengthens the neural pathways that inhibit the dysfunctional pathway. Thus, it does not “fix” it, but it minimizes (or reduces) the signal’s strength, so that the intensity of the response is lowered.

    I hope this adds to the conversation (author, Sound-Rage”) Recommend

  • Gratgy

    @Reema
    You and your friends just dont get my point. If you think there is something wrong, you go first to the doctor, not to the the web. I have seen a lot of people who go to the the web and think they have all sorts of problems.

    I never said you have cyberchondria not did i disrespect you but the current trend of trying to self diagnose by going to the internet is an extremely dangerous practice and should not be encouraged.

    If you read some of the comments above, then either they are all your friends, or they might not necessarily be suffering from the same problem. They might possibly be suffering from other problems which might require treatment.

    You being an upcoming doctor yourself, i would not have expexted you to mention that you went to the web and then to the doctor.Recommend

  • Donnie

    i have had misophonia since i was 10 and i’m 59, no dr. i saw, knew what this was and i was diagnosed in early 90’s with hyperacusis and given a prescription to go have custom earplugs made and i wore them every night, i cannot sleep without them, to this day. i not only have hyperacusis (bionic hearing) i have misophonia but none of my dr’s. had heard of it, i have educated them as to what it is, taking them articles from dr. marsha johnson and others. i went to an audiologist who confirmed i do have it, along with tinnitus but since misophonia is no YET recognized as a ‘real’ disorder, the only diagnosis he could give me was hyperacusis. the triggers are not only hearing but seeing and feeling, as in someone chewing gum, the sound and sight of it, same with people who eat like pigs and make horrible sounds and chew with their mouth opened, the sound and feel of someone’s bass, in my apt. has caused me such rage, i’ve kicked holes in 2 doors, and that’s not me, ‘normally’. i have so many triggers, way too many to list. and to Gratgy, dr’s are just people, if they never studied this, how can they possibly, help you? Recommend

  • adah

    Whoa @Anon:
    Talk about aggression and anger . . .
    No slight intended.
    PeaceRecommend

  • adah

    @Marsha Johnson:
    Typo?? Exposure therapy effective??Recommend

  • Insaan

    Author: “As the person grows older, the limbic system’s response to these triggers becomes stronger, and often the number of triggers increases, accompanied by visual stimuli.”

    Anxiety feeds on itself. From the above statement it appears this problem is a learned behavior.Recommend

  • Reema

    @Maryum Tariq:
    I went first to a general physician at AKUH, who suggested I that seek therapy for this.Recommend

  • adah

    I have a real and palpable dislike for opinions based on fragments of select information. And that IS learned behavior.
    Misophonia is NOT learned behavior. If I was, the thousands of us who have been treated psychologically would be cured. Unless, of course we all had lousy therapists over the decades we sought treatment and relief.
    Here’s the point: if you do not know about it or experience it, if you haven’t studied it, don’t pick apart something you read and come to conclusions or suggest strong conjecture.
    There are many cases of people with Misophonia who were separated from their biological families at birth and raised by neurotypical parents. They find their genetic origins later in life and discover their genetic link to this disorder in siblings and/or other family members.
    Hopefully this will now be enough information for you to stop detracting from the author’s brave expression of reality for many of us. A person with Misophonia (or anyone) who desires to educate others so that they can recognize and be aware is not looking for naysayers or instant experts.
    Please allow people to have their truth. Recommend

  • Murt

    Many of the comments here sound just like the objections I’ve heard to this my whole life from friends and family. “Stop being so sensitive.” “Deal with it.” “Ignore it.” Your comments are noted, but they are dead wrong. Please be more open minded.

    I’m a laid-back person who does not get upset or stressed about much in life. I’m always happy, and take a very calm and metered approach to problems. I never lose my temper. That said, certain sounds make me furiously angry in a millisecond. While I’m able to control myself and not freak out when a trigger sound is heard, the immediate internal reaction has never been stronger. It manifests as a heightened awareness of the trigger sound – anxiously awaiting it’s return while simultaneously dreading it. I cannot think. I cannot ignore it. All I can think is “how do I make it stop?!” It is an instant fight or flight response, and it is powerful. In the presence of a trigger, I’m able to control my outward response 9/10 times, but I’m absolutely screaming on the inside. Often my hands start to shake and my heart rate will rise. The urge to react can be unbearable – all from the sound of a slurp! It sounds a little ridiculous to the average person.

    Of course we can choose not to respond by punching walls, but it’s far more difficult than you might think. It brings such a deep helpless feeling that it nearly brings me to tears on a weekly basis, trying to escape from or eliminate a trigger without being seen as crazy.

    Misophonia is real, and this article accurately portrays it.Recommend

  • sindi

    I discovere two days ago when I google my behaviour I just thought that I was allergic to sounds I actualy saw it as a weakness. Thank you so much for this info otherwise I wouldn’t have known what’s. Biting. I hope a cure will soon be foundRecommend

  • Reema

    @Gratgy:
    I am against self diagnosis too, and always have been, even before I started med school. Please read the part again where I have mentioned I found about it ‘accidentally’. I have to do a lot of medicine-related research on the web, and I came across it while doing so. Then, I proceeded on to see a doctor. How difficult is it all to understand? I have been quite clear, but if you’re forming such opinions out of this, then it really isn’t my fault.Recommend

  • Insaan

    @adah: Misophonia is NOT learned behavior. If I was, the thousands of us who have been treated psychologically WOULD BE CURED. Unless, of course we all had lousy therapists over the decades we sought treatment and relief.

    Why thousands of people with Misophonia being treated PSYCHOLOGICALLY in the first place if it is not a psychological disorder? Psychological disorders (like OCD, DEPRESSION, PSTD) are very hard to treat. Only a very small percentage of people get well.Recommend

  • Insaan

    @adah: . A person with Misophonia (or anyone) who desires to educate others so that they can recognize and be aware is not looking for naysayers or instant experts.

    I know author has good intentions, but with so many generic symptoms many people are going to self diagnose themselves as suffering from this disorder.

    Do you know when a doctor is sick he goes to another doctor for treatment?

    Did any neurologist diagnose the author’s disease? She was just told to get therapy (psychotherapy I guess).Recommend

  • Insaan

    @Anon: I myself have several health problems and I think a lay person wouldn’t have adjusted and been as understanding with me, as my husband who is a surgeon.

    It depends on the nature of your problems. If doctors tell you there is nothing wrong with you, your problems may be of psychological nature. A good husband and wife is suppose to help each other. I don’t think a “surgeon” can understand and treat all problems.Recommend

  • Adah

    @Insaan:
    Why thousands of people with Misophonia being treated PSYCHOLOGICALLY in the first place if it is not a psychological disorder?

    Because we went to doctors who had no idea about Misophonia and referred us to psychologists. And we didn’t know any better either so we went. And doctors still have no clue. There is no neurological exam or diagnosis. That’s why it’s important for us to get into the public eye to educate as much as possible and we deal with people like you who already know everything

    I know author has good intentions, but with so many generic symptoms many people are going to self diagnose themselves as suffering from this disorder.

    The symptoms are anything BUT generic. Please read the article. Recommend

  • Clare

    Thank you so much. Misophonia has been affecting my life for a long time now and all this time I’d thought of it as nothing but an over reaction, like I was the only one. I’m so glad I’m not alone and that people can actually understand. Wow, just thank you. Recommend

  • ? geha

    This is the first time I have visited this site. I have only just recently found this word MISOPHONIA and it has changed my life. So many pieces of the puzzle are falling into place for me after a lifelong journey of trying every therapy imagineable to “fix my noise thing” as I have always called it. I want to say thankyou to the author of the above article for articulating exactly what I myself have experienced. Also thankyou to Judith Krauthamer for bringing forth her book which has been so helpful for me. And the blog from Murt above really speaks to me too, as do so many others who have shared their personal experiences. The human race is evolving. Doctors and therapists are evolving. Knowledge is evolving. So anyone who ‘blames’ a doctor or therapist should take a good look at their ‘projections’. Consciousness is evolving and there is no blame to be laid ANYWHERE. Thank goodness we have a developing awareness that can lead us to discover the root of this very strange and very painful condition. Physical pain is no different to Psychological pain. Believe me! In the 1970’s I heard a series of tapes by a woman named Pia Melody called “Permission to Be Precious”…. wherein she described the dynamics of the effects of physical abuse, psychological abuse, emotional abuse, mental abuse and spiritual abuse…. laid upon an innocent growing child (no blame… the parents were doing their best at the time there is no doubt)…. but I locked myself in a room listening to these tapes and cried for the entire week as no-one in my life had ever come CLOSE to verbalizing the suffering I had experienced inside me from childhood. That led me on my own journey. I have learned mindfulness meditation and many other support methods for myself, but I always used to say to friends that when a trigger happened, i.e. throat-clearing, clicking pens, chewing gum etc., the only way I could describe what happened inside me was that it was like someone slitting open the skin on my shin bone and then rubbing a metal file over it again and again and again. That’s what happened inside my skin on a sensory level. I learned to internalise my rage by punching my ears under a blanket so no-one in my family could hear me and cry and cry and cry and beg God to make me deaf. Right now, I am 67, alive, dancing, meditating and active (I do have a bad throat clearing condition that is driving me nuts… ironically!) but my torturous condition of Misophonia has caused me to reach deep into the truth of myself and search for answers and it has taken an enormous amount of letting go and understanding the habits of the body and the mind. But I am very optimistic and have no doubt the hunger to understand will bring forth the science that is needed. Thankyou for this opportunity to share with everyone. GehaRecommend

  • Asif Jalil

    I am proud of Reema, my daughter, for letting us know the problem and by writing this she has and would numerous people who are suffering from this problem and those who were unable to interpret such behavior.Recommend

  • Insaan

    @Adah: “There is no neurological exam or diagnosis. That’s why it’s important for us to get into the public eye to educate”

    First you need to know what the diagnosis or treatment is. Many comments by educators and experts don’t jab with each other.

    Author says: Studies reveal that the occurrence of many psychological disorders in a person suffering from Misophonia is DECREASED, with one exception that is OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder), which is found in 52.4% of the cases. I have OCD as well and in my experience it gets worse after an episode of exposure to the triggers.

    Also, CHRONIC ANXIETY AND MULTIPLE PHOBIAS are VERY COMMON in these patient.

    Judith Krauthamer: I believe that the neural circuitry of ‘misophonia’ and OCD are quite different.

    Marsha Johnson suspects this is a kind of variant of OCD, however, and would add there are several choices for managing the problems…. she recommends many psychological treatments.

    GEHA: Misophonia has caused me to reach deep into the truth of myself and search for answers and it has taken an enormous amount of letting go and understanding the habits of the body and the mind

    MURT: I’m always happy, and take a very calm and metered approach to problems. I never lose my temper……. I’m able to control my outward response 9/10 timesRecommend

  • Insaan

    @Adah: There is no neurological exam or diagnosis. That’s why it’s important for us to get into the public eye to educate.

    Educate what, even medical profession has not defined what it is and how it should be treated.

    Reema: Studies reveal that the occurrence of many psychological disorders in a person suffering from Misophonia is decreased……. with one exception that is OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder), which is found in 52.4% of the cases. occurrence of OCD among these patients, there was thought to be a connection between the two. But, there has been no proof of that. I have OCD as well and in my experience it gets worse after an episode of exposure to the triggers. Also, CHRONIC ANXIETY and MULTIPLE PHOBIAS are very common in these patients.

    Judith: I BELIEVE that the neural circuitry of ‘misophonia’ and OCD are quite different.

    Marsha: 20% of those with this disorder have been diagnosed with OCD.
    So I believe it to be less than you have stated. I suspect this is a KIND OF VARIANT OF OCD.

    Geha: but my torturous condition of Misophonia has caused me to reach deep into the truth of myself and search for answers and it has taken an enormous amount of letting go and understanding the habits of the body and the mind.Recommend

  • adah

    please, let us not feed the trollRecommend