In the commune: The Sialkot lynching

Published: August 30, 2010
Email

Mughees and Muneeb, the brothers who were killed in Sialkot.

Last week two young brothers,Mughees and Muneeb were lynched by a mob in Sialkot. The incident has been condemned by all quarters. Interior Minister Rehman Malik has called it a national dilemma while the Supreme Court has taken up the issue as well. We asked Tribune bloggers and readers what the Sialkot lynching meant for justice in Pakistan:

Ayesha Umar:

I’ve observed and witnessed that the police force works for those who have deep pockets. If you want a police protection buy them. If you want to harass someone through police buy them. Police is at your service if you are ready pay the price. It is a dysfunctional department and the possibility of any reformation is nil. The culprits of this case would be nabbed and brought to task but will that change the attitude of police?

Farhad Hameed:

In the absence of a justice system, this was justice in its purest form. Criminals in Pakistan have little fear of the system which works in their favor. The people of Pakistan will break these chains of slavery once in a while to prove a point, that if justice is not delivered then they are willing to take the law into their hands.

Furkan Ali:

I’m told these incidents stem from the mistrust in our justice system. Justice, if any, is delayed and thus denied. So instead, we take the law into our own hands. Some sort of street justice I suppose. Expeditious and cheap. No fancy lawyers in black coats. No judgements draped in legal jargon. Just good old street justice. For the people by the people. But instantaneous justice is cosmetic and dangerous. It’s the kind of justice which condemns a person unheard.Regardless of whether Mughees and Muneed were guilty, surely they deserved a chance to explain themselves.

Tehreem Mahmood:

Of course, we want vengeance right after we are looted at gun point but how many regular do people actually take revenge? I know, if I got a chance, I might want to beat the hell out of a bandit but I also know I could only torture someone to a limit. Let’s face it – street crime is the reason why people react. There are those who die as a result. Only a few survive.

Rai Muhammad Azlan Shahid:

One of my friends tweeted: “First in #Sialkot, next outside your front door. That’s how it usually goes when you let things like this ‘slide’. #Pakistan.” This whole society is turning into a bunch of wild animals; we prefer to burn the bandits and thieves and kill two innocent boys and never let the decisive authority to do its job. There is no need of suspension of the staff of the police station, they better be dismissed from the job as we don’t need executioners in the suit of rescuers. Something must be done to make sure that such things never happen.

Adeel Sher:

I am surprised at how harshly people have reacted to the incident at Sialkot. This is not the first incident of its kind. Two years back a similar incidents happened in Karachi where people burnt down 4 people in front of mobs. Plus such incidents are a routine in our society but we don’t realize it because we dont have videos to watch.

Hina Baig:

I could not sleep and I could not stop crying after watching them being treated so cruelly. I see a murderer in every person living in Sialkot. Please do something to give justice to their souls. If we don’t speak out now then it could be our sons or brothers tomorrow.

The Commune

The Commune

The Tribune community blog. Mini-blogs that represent a myriad of opinions on various issues.

The views expressed by the writer and the reader comments do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of The Express Tribune.