Why the deafening silence after rape?

Published: February 22, 2011

Rape is motivated by the desire for power rather than sexual attraction.

Many people believe that rape is a sexual act. Although rape involves sexual acts, it is motivated by the desire for power and control over another person rather than by sexual attraction or the desire for sexual gratification.

In other words, rape is a crime of violence.

A rapist uses actual force or violence — or the threat of it — to take control over another human being. Some rapists use drugs to take away a person’s ability to fight back. Rape is a crime, whether the person committing it is a stranger, a date, an acquaintance, or a family member.

“I prefer to characterise rape simply as a form of torture. Like the torturer, the rapist is motivated by the urge to dominate, humiliate, and destroy his victim. Like a torturer, he does so by using the most intimate acts available to humans — sexual ones.” Helen Benedict (British-American novelist and journalist)

Rape is not a ‘war trophy’

Rape has accompanied warfare in virtually every known historical era. During armed conflict, rape has been frequently used as a means of psychological warfare.

Military leaders have been known to actually encourage their soldiers to rape civilians. An estimated 500,000 women were raped during the 1994 Rwandan Genocide and, in 1998, the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda made landmark decisions defining rape as a crime of genocide under international law.

“From time immemorial, rape has been regarded as spoils of war. Now it will be considered a war crime. We want to send out a strong message that rape is no longer a trophy of war.”

Frequency of rape in Pakistan

Violence against women makes up 95 per cent of cases of violence reported in Pakistan. These statistics are even more chilling, bearing in mind that 70 per cent of cases of violence against women do not get registered. The Human Rights Commission of Pakistan estimates that a rape occurs in Pakistan every two hours and a gang rape every eight hours.

Aurat Foundation’s report titled Situation of Violence against Women in Pakistan 2010 discloses that Punjab dominates with 2,690 registered cases out of a total of 4,069 incidents in various parts of Pakistan.

Interior Ministry documents placed before the National Assembly in 2008 revealed that a staggering 7,546 women were raped in a mere 24-month span between 2007-2009, a rate of 314 rapes every month.

According to War Against Rape, data released by 103 police stations in Karachi show an eight per cent rise in registered cases and seven per cent more medico-legal examinations in 2010 from 2009.

Since courts do not place restraining orders on all the accused released on bail, they often continue to harass the survivors. Whither justice when 31 per cent of cases reported against a family member have resulted in the family shifting away from their home, and removing themselves from the legal system to avoid social persecution?

The conviction rate in sexual assault cases is abysmal — three per cent annually since 2003.

Survivor statistics in 2010

Female victims: 95 per cent

Raped by more than one offender: 32 per cent

Victims between the ages 18-23 years: 33 per cent

Victims from displaced families: 31 per cent

Victims between the ages 6-11 years: 15 per cent

Victims under 16 years of age: 43 per cent

Victims under 18 years of age:55 per cent

Victims between the ages 12-17 years: 25 per cent

Custodians of the law as predators

The low conviction rate can be attributed to a number of factors, one of which is the involvement of police themselves in these heinous crimes.

According to an Interior Ministry report, the number of cases of torture and rape by police officials has increased by 60 per cent during the last three years.

Lack of accountability and corruption are also major factors in lack of convictions. How will justice be served when authorities themselves are not convinced that a horrendous crime has been committed? The response of the police to the gang rape of a young woman in Karachi is a case in point when there was much tasteless indulging in blame-the-victim behaviour on not just the part of the police, but even senior government officials.

Another factor impeding convictions is political connections which can grease the palms of the highest police officers, as evidenced in Dr Shazia Khalid’s rape case of 2005 and the JPMC nurse’s ordeal at the hands of a MLO.

The Ministry of Women’s Development is under the prime minister’s authority; the Women’s Parliamentary Caucus is headed by the Speaker of the National Assembly and comprises of women MNAs who are strong supporters of women’s rights. Why don’t these wings lobby the government with support from the National Commission on the Status of Women (NCSW)?

Can these privileged women not play a role to reduce the level of barbarity perpetrated against women in all corners of Pakistan? Apart from an urgent need to review Pakistan’s rape laws, properly documented medical investigations are also crucial in cases of rape, gang rape and sexual assault.

Real life vs reel life

I once had the misfortune of watching a regressive Indian film which featured the winsome Juhi Chawla as a rape victim who was determined to erase the black blotch on her “reputation” by courting, winning over and eventually marrying her rapist.

The storyline was enough to make my head reel, and wonder why such a pathetic script was written in the first place. But I was brought down to earth with a resounding thud when I learnt of a recent real life case which took place in Pakistan

Mailsi Moza Arain resident Hajra* rejected a marriage proposal from her neighbour Riaz*. Local land lords then called a panchayat on his request. The panchayat was told by Riaz that his proposal had been rejected because the woman was having an affair and that she should be given a harsh sentence.

Residents of the village said that the panchayat forcefully performed a nikah ceremony where Hajra was wed to Riaz.

“The girl was crying and clearly shook her head to indicate ‘no’ every time she was asked about the marriage. The men took no notice.”

Following the nikah, Riaz and three of his friends took Hajra into a room and raped her. According to villagers, the men later boasted about having ‘taught her a lesson’ for her previous conduct.

“They openly flaunted the fact that they had raped her for rejecting him. They feared no consequences.”

Following the sexual assault, the panchayat ruled that Hajra* be turned out of the village and never be allowed to set foot in the area again. Hajra then approached the Women’s Crisis Centre and has sought refuge in one of their offices in Vehari. To add salt to her wounds, the police have refused to file her case against the panchayat as well as against Raza and his accomplices.

As horrifying as this story is, what is notable is the lack of media, police or judicial interest in this case. It seems that Raymond Davis is the only “criminal” who is deserving of the sternest punishment in Pakistan.

Daughters of the nation?

If a terrorist like Dr Aafia Siddiqui can be feted as “qaum ki beti” by foaming and frothing mullahs and their excitable sidekicks, then why is there this deafening silence when it comes to rape victims? Why don’t our religious scholars condemn the crime, as well as the ostracism these women, set upon by ravenous men, have to face?

Despite the lip service paid to the rights of women and their honour, most women in Pakistan are treated as chattels and dirt, to be trod on, spat upon and trashed verbally and physically. The vernacular abuses favoured by men are punctuated by gross ‘mother and sister’ references.

If there is so much respect for women in Islam, then why is there a daily litany of abuse heaped on their heads?

Learning to live again

If rape is used as a weapon in “the destruction of the spirit, of the will to live, and of life itself”, how does a rape survivor learn to pick up the shattered pieces of her life? Not everyone can be a Mukhtaran Mai or a Tori Amos who says, “I survived this torture which left me paralysed for years. I really do feel as though I was psychologically mutilated that night. I found a way to dance with sorrow… though I can’t change what happened, I can choose how to react. And I don’t want to spend the rest of my life being bitter and locked up.”

Rape survivors should be encouraged to give language to their ordeal, because talking about it is in itself a cathartic experience.

Author of After Silence: Rape and My Journey Back, Nancy Raine admits:

words seemed to make it visible. But, speaking, even when it embarrassed me, also slowly freed me from the shame I felt. The more I struggled to speak, the less power the rape, and its aftermath, seemed to have over me.”

In Pakistan, where there is a conspiracy of silence about rape, the last couple of days have seen a commendable online initiative.

Gawaahi, a website launched by Sana Saleem and Naveen Naqvi aims to archive digital stories of abuse, survival and resistance. The founders of the initiative hope it will provide a sense of empowerment for people to no longer see themselves as victims, but as survivors, no matter what their ordeal.

In the words of the incomparable Maya Angelou:

“You may trod me

In the very dirt

But still,

like dust

I’ll rise again.”

*Names have been changed to protect the identity of the victim

Maheen Usmani

Maheen Usmani

A freelance writer who has covered subjects ranging from socio-political issues to women's rights to counter terrorism, sports, travel, culture and music. Maheen tweets @MaheenUsmani twitter.com/MaheenUsmani

The views expressed by the writer and the reader comments do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of The Express Tribune.

  • Sara Khan

    Maheen,

    Excellent piece work!.

    Good luckRecommend

  • Ilmana Fasih

    Maheen, I commend you for writing this article and highlighting a very serious and sensitive issue, not just for Pakistani bit for women all over the world.
    What we see reported are just the tip of the iceberg–the cases that get reported are barely in the single digit.

    One point I would like to highlight is that not just in Pakistan but elsewhere, majority of the rapes are committed by the perpetrators known to the victims–be it uncle, cousin, friend etc. It is important for the girls to know that.

    Kudos again, Maheen, for all the statistics and the references you gave in this well researched piece.Recommend

  • Ilmana Fasih

    I am amazed by your sense of words for Dr Aafia. People who go to every extend to shoe lick the masters in the US and in return when you adopt their culture their boundless ways then you should be ready for the results as well. Its a complete package. Recommend

  • Ashmeet singh sidhu

    Brilliant article Maheen.Why only in pakistan this is something which is happening all over the world.Infact the maximum in U.S. .Basically it is the mindset of the people that needs to change.Kids need to be taught at a young age to respect girls.Recommend

  • http://aacounterterror.wordpress.com Anas Abbas

    Awesome piece maheen, well researched & well articulated. Hit the nail on the head. The statistics quoted above are just horrendous and its quite ironic that rape related violence is so pervasive in a country that is sharia fanatic. You should have also mentioned the role of hudood ordinance as well in contribution towards increased rape related violence.

    Thanks for writing this piece. Recommend

  • sdfsdfsdfsdf

    Some people will say that the judiciary has some independent minded people on it, and it might, but by virtue of it being part of a kufr system, (a system of disbelief), those elements, I fear, will have their efforts rendered less effective. Some people will say that the conditions of acceptable rape in the interior and sindh has nothign to do with the west, but ask yourself how the “wadera” system originated -it was the british who granted indian loyalists, the most treacherous and corrupt elements in the land, those lands. Some people will say that having zardari elected as president, and conditions this created for women in pakistan (and everyone else in general) is something pakistanis brought upon themselves, and while that may be partially true, ask yourself what men like john kerry (who lost in a rigged election himself) were doing in pakistan, when the elections were taking place? WAKE UP! The conditions of injustice have been imposed on pakistan through a combination of local treachery and connivance with imposing foreign absolutely antagonistic elements. They have always feared a nuclear armed muslim state, and have tried to throw as many de-stabalizing elements into pakistan as possible. I love my sisters, and want to see ANYONE who lays a hand on them dead, but i know that much of the impetus for their rape originates from washington! The local as well as the international elements responsible for this must both be hunted down and wiped out!Recommend

  • Spam Robot

    You will not achieve a lot with your article cause you have tried to be all self righteous and offended a majority of Pakistanis by calling Aafia a terrorist. Why sidetrack an important piece of writing with such juvenile behavior?

    Another issue I have is that deliberately or subconsciously you try to establish that we condone rape and people in the west (all your quotes) really understand the heinous nature of the crime. News flash: Rape is Rape. There is no left vs right, liberal vs conservative, east vs west in this equation. Recommend

  • Shahbaz lodhi

    Nicely written, in fact this was the point you tried to divulge and disclose it on a big scale,,,,,, well doneRecommend

  • Saad Ahmed

    Its sad to see that u labelled Dr. Aafia as a terrorist..Recommend

  • Sara

    Excellent Maheen.

    But the point is, in out society if one speak about such issue all condemns him or her.

    If a lady stands and say that a person raped her, How society will react to her?

    To avoid that reaction, and the defame people dont report. I really salute to those who do this dare.

    But narrow mindedness, male schovanism, and dominance, all this is creating a filthy society. and we have to teach our children the manners, the humanity but what about those who are illiterate, dont want to learn, they dont know even how to offer prayer but they claim themselves to b a muslim, Recommend

  • http://www.tanzeel.wordpress.com Tanzeel

    I disagree with the notion that rape is motivated by the desire of power and control over other person. I don’t think there is any single theory that conclusively explains the motivation for rape.

    Motivation for rape can have multiple reasons as we have already read about various motivations of a rapist in terms of socioeconomics, anger, sadism, sexual pleasure, psychopathy, ethical standards, attitudes toward women etc however in any case rape is indeed a crime of violence that must be strictly dealt with.Recommend

  • Parvez

    Great write up.
    In my mind I am clear on one aspect and that is in our country if any head way is to be made in alleviating this problem it will have to be done forcefully by the women and they will receive very little assistance from the men. Recommend

  • Parvez

    Great write up.
    The one thing I am clear in my mind about is that, in our country, if anything has to be done to reduce this problem it will have to be forcefully done by the women as they will receive very little help from the men.Recommend

  • Anis Dani

    I salute you from speaking up. While this is not the only abhorring practice condoned by our society, it is certainly one of the most heinious and least talked about. The victim is victimized twice, first by the perpetrator(s), then by society. Please continue this struggle. I find it sad that not a single male has commented on your blog until now.Recommend

  • http://dinopak.wordpress.com Hasan

    If a terrorist like Dr Aafia Siddiqui can be feted as “qaum ki beti” by foaming and frothing mullahs and their excitable sidekicks, then why is there this deafening silence when it comes to rape victims? Why don’t our religious scholars condemn the crime, as well as the ostracism these women, set upon by ravenous men, have to face?

    Your article is thought provoking and an eyeopener, but I should warn you of the fact that in Mullah’s Islam there is something called the Hudood Ordinance, according to which not only the offender is convicted, the poor victim (the raped woman) have to be stoned too for adultery.

    It just doesn’t make any sense to me, but that is how the Mullah sees it. Therefore, it is best if the poor woman is silent about the heinous crimes against her (atleast in Pakistan). Recommend

  • faraz

    Here mullahs blame the victim as if she was inviting others to rape her. Mullahs also promote the 4 witness law, as if the rapes are performed in public places.

    @sdfsdf

    So rape is a CIA/Mossad/Raw conspiracy to destablize a nuclear armed nation. You have taken conspiracy theories to a whole new level.Recommend

  • Atif

    good one but its and advertisement spamRecommend

  • Atif

    u called afia terrorist while writing up for gwaahi – Recommend

  • Ahmad Ali Latif

    Its a good article Maheen.
    The thing which i would like to point out here is lack of education and frustration. These both contribute towards thoughts which provoke the act of rape.
    The forced rape, as it is common in tribal areas around the country, is primarily due the devolution of mentality and chauvinism which is still thought as being proud. The jirgas in such areas who have given themselves power do decide such matters are the most illiterate cave-men to be present in the time.
    Sadly, in our country if a female has been raped she is urged even by her family to stay quiet. The statistics you have mentioned are all but on the low side of what is happening. It is not that rape only takes place in low-income and tribal areas, many educated people living well-off are culprits of this crime, but the victim’s families due to their image never let it out.
    The total outlook of a rape victim needs to be changed if they are to survive, sadly in our country rape victims are looked upon as degenerating beings and condemned away (ostracism). Even some of our educated breed shares this view.
    Until this is changed the rape victims will be psychologically tortured throughout their life. Everyone is involved in this violent act which completely destroys a woman, from our law protectorates to our criminals.
    Today, thanks to medical advancement, rape culprits can be pinpointed using a simple DNA test which should be enough evidence to throw them behind bars. Considering the quality of our judicial system, one thinks for how long will they be behind bars and what new vengeful atrocities they might commit after being “released”
    Secondly, I along with many other feel offended while you called Dr Aafia a terrorist, please do choose better references while writing an important piece like this so not to offend anyone and let your voice be heard as being unbiased towards sensitive sentiments.Recommend

  • Ahmad Ali Latif

    I appreciate the voicing of this issue Maheen
    The thing which i would like to point out here is lack of education and frustration. These both contribute towards thoughts which provoke the act of rape.
    The forced rape, as it is common in tribal areas around the country, is primarily due the devolution of mentality and chauvinism which is still thought as being proud. The jirgas in such areas who have given themselves power do decide such matters are the most illiterate cave-men to be present in the time.
    Sadly, in our country if a female has been raped she is urged even by her family to stay quiet. The statistics you have mentioned are all but on the low side of what is happening. It is not that rape only takes place in low-income and tribal areas, many educated people living well-off are culprits of this crime, but the victim’s families due to their image never let it out.
    The total outlook of a rape victim needs to be changed if they are to survive, sadly in our country rape victims are looked upon as degenerating beings and condemned away (ostracism). Even some of our educated breed shares this view.
    Until this is changed the rape victims will be psychologically tortured throughout their life. Everyone is involved in this violent act which completely destroys a woman, from our law protectorates to our criminals.
    Today, thanks to medical advancement, rape culprits can be pinpointed using a simple DNA test which should be enough evidence to throw them behind bars. Considering the quality of our judicial system, one thinks for how long will they be behind bars and what new vengeful atrocities they might commit after being “released”
    Secondly, I along with many other feel offended while you called Dr Aafia a terrorist, please do choose better references while writing an important piece like this so not to offend anyone and let your voice be heard as being unbiased towards sensitive sentiments.Recommend

  • Safiya Aftab

    Good piece! Maybe you could broaden it out by talking about sexual assault generally, which covers a lot of actions and is probably very widespread.Recommend

  • Ahmad Ali Latif

    Its a good article Maheen.
    The thing which i would like to point out here is lack of education and frustration. These both contribute towards thoughts which provoke the act of rape.
    The forced rape, as it is common in tribal areas around the country, is primarily due the devolution of mentality and chauvinism which is still thought as being proud. The jirgas in such areas who have given themselves power do decide such matters are the most illiterate cave-men to be present in the time.
    Sadly, in our country if a female has been raped she is urged even by her family to stay quiet. The statistics you have mentioned are all but on the low side of what is happening. It is not that rape only takes place in low-income and tribal areas, many educated people living well-off are culprits of this crime, but the victim’s families due to their image never let it out.
    The total outlook of a rape victim needs to be changed if they are to survive, sadly in our country rape victims are looked upon as degenerating beings and condemned away (ostracism). Even some of our educated breed shares this view.
    Until this is changed the rape victims will be psychologically tortured throughout their life. Everyone is involved in this violent act which completely destroys a woman, from our law protectorates to our criminals.
    Today, thanks to medical advancement, rape culprits can be pinpointed using a simple DNA test which should be enough evidence to throw them behind bars. Considering the quality of our judicial system, one thinks for how long will they be behind bars and what new vengeful atrocities they might commit after being “released”
    Secondly, I along with many other feel offended while you called Dr Aafia a terrorist, please do choose better references while writing an important piece like this so not to offend anyone and let your voice be heard as being unbiased towards sensitive sentiments.

    (P.S please donot write your email address at the comments section as it visible to next commentator, [because the email of the last person is visible to me])Recommend

  • Ahmad Ali Latif

    Very well written Maheen ….A issue no one wants to address.we behave as it does not exsit izzat being lost in society is more to them than which is already lost in a incident like .. They seem to forget the trauma the person goes through scared for life because there is no justice or support system ..The statistics are frighting…Muhafiz are the ones taking advantage of the situation …Makes me ashamed they have turned a beautiful religion into something people look at with disgust …All because of our deeds …Sure we have a system but only by name ..Recommend

  • Hanif Awan

    Be blessed,MAHEEN.Recommend

  • Kashif Jan

    Excellent stuff Maheen – an eye opener and a matter of shame for the state.Recommend

  • Jeddy

    Rape is a crime – it is committed by criminals. However rape also exists because of poor social controls and bad upbringing. Would a man be proud to tell his family about what he has done? Rape is also committed by the mentally ill. Rape is always is about domination, control and manipulation – regardless in which society it takes place. People who order are criminally insane – the men who do it are severely damaged by it . They have to sweep away every bit of the conscience, their empathy, their sense of disgust to do it. Go ahead and harm someone else is not something easy and it is a nightmare to live with afterwards.Recommend

  • F. Alam

    The author deserves applaud for raising her voice againt the injustice against women.

    Rape is a very complex topic and is very sad. What most men don’t understand is the fact that rape is not about sex, it is about violence and violating the physical & mental space of the victim. Recommend

  • Raqib Ali

    Let’s hang all the rapists & paedophiles. Recommend

  • http://bakedsunshine.wordpress.com/ Shumaila

    This is simply excellent Maheen. Rape is still such a tremendously important issue but it needs to be constantly hammered into the minds of the populace, especially with regards to the terrible social, psychological, physical consequences it has on the victim. If your statistics are correct we’re still not doing enough about it. More awareness, if it leads to more action, will help.Recommend

  • http://www.nooru.wordpress.com Nooru Jalal

    Such heinous incidents in our loam always force a loyal citizen to speak up for justice, rights and for his or her land. Maheen’s striking exposit article made me to ask you a question. Is this land is pure? Statistics from a wide variety of sources show that we are far away from a sense of insaniat. Being a Pakistani Muslim; I’m so embarrassed and ashamed. To me such incidents are worser then floods. I thank you so much Mehreen for raising your voice all the times against the evils, intolerance, injustice and bigotry. This brave soil one InshaAllah will speak up for change to create a sense of Pakistaniat and Insaniat. I love the way you have penned down it- And Yes!! Radical dogmas should be labeled as terrorists. Here I want to share a Hadith Of beloved Prophet Muhammad(SAW):

    “People ask Him at the last hour. ” They asked O’ Prophet of God! What do you ask of us in this finale hours. Prophet Said: I ask you to take care of the WOMEN and treat them with GOODNESS and RESPECT.”

    Peace:)Recommend

  • http://bhagatsinghstudy.blogspot.com Chaman Lal

    On certain matters, particularly on women related issues, writer Maheen Usmani is in her sensitivity best. Irony and tragedy of this issue is that while humanity”s highest stage is described by Marx as ‘when men and women have most natural and spontaneous relations’, yet the path to most natural relationship is so full of thorns and terrors like ‘rape’. If natural relationship between men and women, which includes their sexual unity as highest form of pleasure,but which can be achieved only if this union comes from the most deep mutual feelings of love on both sides-man and woman.If it is highest pleasure in love, it is most despicable crime in the form of rape, any physical pleasure sought through force by one party,i.e. that is man in 99.9% cases world over, will always remain a blot on the whole humanity.The situation not only in Pakistan, but in whole South Asia, may be in Arab world as well, may not be much different. Even buying woman’s body with money is an insult to humanity, though may not be as big crime as rape.Kudos to Maheen for such sensitive writings on the issues facing humanity. Ironically even in so called ‘free’ or sexually permissive societies, ‘rapes’ and violence on women take place, though in a little lesser numbers.Recommend

  • safoora

    Maheen …a beautiful piece…….rape is act of humiliation.You highlighted that beautifully.Recommend

  • Toots

    @Saad Ahmed:
    We have rapists running around the country with impunity…..and you are worried about Aafia being called a terrorist??? What a joke!Recommend

  • shazia khan

    Excellent piece of work Maheen! well researched and articulate as always putting the point across. keep up the crusade against injustice. Recommend

  • Mohsin Abbas

    Simply awesome :)Recommend

  • nishat suleman

    Maheen, kudos to you, your article on rape really grasped my attention, the construction, the references and the statistics are well put together.I fully agree that it’s all a matter of control(men’s hands are stronger, are’nt they!)unless the power balance is challenged and gender dynamics is revised, we can not expect things to change. A message,consistent and strong enough,has to get across that rape is a violent crime against women and society, it should not be made to be or dealt with as a matter of honour, pride or power.Our ‘free media’has to stop portraying women as weak, vulnerable,honour’carriers’of men; both urban and rural women are portrayed as such,then there is the mullah feudal nexus, strengthening the negative image of women…….some friday qutba’s are often a testimony to that.I could’nt agree more with the suggestion of women parliamentarians taking up this issue more aggressively, but they are part of the same system, it will take time.You have said a lot, keep it up.Recommend

  • Huma

    Great article Maheen. I am impressed by your research. It’s a shame that Pakistani laws do not protect women and are retrogressive. Our society as a whole needs to be made aware of this issue and you have done a great job in highlighting this issue.Recommend

  • asif

    hi, whatever miss maheen worte in this article i couldn’t agree more, she is absolutely right……
    but it is MOST UNFORTUNATE that in the end of day she cant control her inner liberal fascist mentality by declaring afia siddiqui a terrorist, feel really sorry that how educated and good people can have such negative mentality.Recommend

  • Kamran Iqbal

    Maheen, first of all thank you for informing us with the depth and gravity of the situation. Without sharing these details I would not have known with exactness how deep is this social issue. I think its time to do something against this menace. I think the rightest way to appreciate your effort of informing us is to do something about it. Recommend

  • Shahid

    Nice article Maheen, on a topic which needs to be discussed in the parliment.Recommend

  • saira a

    Well done Maheen.Excellent, well researched article.
    A society where rape remains unreported through shame, intimidation or bribery, the statistics mentioned in your article are in reality tip of an iceberg.
    Till the discriminatory laws like ‘Zina Ordinance’ are in place how can the rape victims break their silence, when they fear the repercussions..Recommend

  • Nafisa

    Great article. just one line i would say… People here are more concerned about what you wrote about Aafiya siddiqui than the point you wanted to put across. You have highlighted a major issue and people should see that. Keep it up!Recommend

  • Atif

    and in one line she called someone terrorist, whose story is still unkown Recommend

  • Waseem Ahmad

    Maheen,

    Excellent piece work!.

    Good luckRecommend

  • Fahed Pervez

    The role of a writer is not to say what we all can say, but what we are unable to say… and this is what you proved here Maheen JiRecommend

  • http://meer-mehernewspappar.blogspot.com Dr Meher Zaidi

    The saddest treatment meted out to Hajra reflects the entire attitude of the nation if you can call Pakistanis that. I see no hope for rape survivors and their families. The crimes of violence against women will continue with daring and open flaunting. There is no hope for Pakistan . The world has already rejected it as a civilized society. One should see the kind of talk that is being talked about Pakistan’s moral and social values all over the world.I see no hope for any semblance to respectability in the comity of nations because we will remain silent on rape and honor killings and now blasphemy killings.Thanks for highlighting this issue again. Keep up your good work.Recommend

  • Talha Waheed

    maheen u have contributed a lot by highlighting the very serious issue in Pakistan but the fact is why people register there cases in police stations when they know that they won’t get justice rather police starts irritating the victims in the name of “investigation” which disturbs the life of not that particular woman but also the whole family of the victim rather destroys it.Moreover in some cases police took that victim girl or a woman to the police station in the name of investigation and they raped them and threatens the family not to tell anyone or force them to withdraw the case and try to settle the case instead of solving it or helping them.
    If luckily this won’t happens with them the victims they are still reluctant to file that case in police station or to share that with anyone because in our society that poor woman is badly humiliated in front of the whole society and that poor lady either throne to the hell of prostituting or forced to die by there own hands or either killed by there siblings.Recommend

  • Fahad Raza

    Agreed on religious scholars’s to came on protest to rape victims in the same way as Dr. Afia Siddiqui, but please Dr. Afia, is not a Terrorist. People say that rape victim are also stoned to death in Islam not true, the culprits are. Think for a second and check the facts before you write. Recommend