Dear Federer, why would you choose to #BleedBlue?

Published: February 17, 2015

PHOTO: ROGER FEDERER FACEBOOK PAGE

Hi Roger,

You know, I’ve never picked up a tennis racket in my entire life.

Nor had I watched much tennis until my mother made me watch Wimbledon, in Karachi, in 2006.  She wanted me to root for Rafa (Rafael Nadal), whom she adores. But I became totally mesmerised by you instead. As David Foster Wallace would later say about you,

“Just to see, close up, power and aggression made vulnerable to beauty is to feel inspired.

And boy was I inspired.

Roger Federer at the O2 in London. Photo: AFP

I started following tennis for the aesthetic high of watching you play. And for the ideological high that you might become the greatest tennis player ever.

On a typical day, I’d spend an hour reading about you, and doing statistical analysis about you. And another hour watching old highlights. A quarter of my Facebook posts were about you. My phone screen showed you winning Roland Garros in 2009.

Dozing off, in between visions of Shahid Afridi mauling India in a World Cup final, I would imagine all the points in your career that I would change if I could: Match Point vs Marat Safin in Melbourne in 2005, Match Point vs Rafa in Rome in 2006,  30-0, 5-4, second set vs Juan Martin in New York in 2009 and the Break Point, fifth set vs Novak Djokovic in London in 2014.

Photos: AFP

Your relationship with Mirka became, and remains, an inspiration for my wife and me. Without my wife’s support I could never have overcome the difficult times in our five years together. So we just love, love, love the fact that Mirka has been the difference between you becoming The Greatest, and you remaining in the pack of men you surpassed.

Roger with his wife Mirka Federer. Photo: AFP

All standard stuff, really. Like thousands of other fans across the world whose lives your tennis has touched. And this doesn’t even include your philanthropy.

But sadly it’s time to say farewell. And yes, this has to do with the picture you posted during the Pakistan-India match. You were holding the Indian team shirt, and posted it with the hashtag #BleedBlue, overtly signifying support for India over Pakistan.

Before I go further, I want to say that it’s completely understandable that you would want to root for India. They are an incredible side. You’ve personally met the legend Sachin Tendulkar. It’s a very welcoming country and you were given an adoring welcome there. Heck, so was I when I visited! So I get why you would want to support India.

Roger playing with Deepika Padukone (L) and meeting Sachin Tendulkar (R). Photos: AFP

(Of course like any red-blooded Pakistani, I would want to change your mind by telling you about the invention, magic and genius that characterise our cricket. Not to mention our 85-64 lead over India in matches across all three formats.)

But no, I’m not upset that you chose to support India over Pakistan. I’m upset that you chose to support India over Pakistan, publicly. This made it seem like your Pakistani fans are expendable.

Let’s be clear. In India, posting this picture was a stroke of genius. It has thousands of comments from your Indian fans like:

“Love you Roger, I have become a bigger fan!”

It currently has more than 250,ooo Likes and 31,000 Shares. That far surpasses your previous ten posts, which had an average of 60,000 likes and 1,100 shares. It has generated tremendous goodwill for you in the largest untapped tennis market on Earth. Who wouldn’t want that?

Inevitably though, in Pakistan it had the opposite effect. After you posted the picture, I did an informal poll of the dozen biggest Pakistani Roger fans I know. All very serious fans, mind you. Two of them were not bothered by the picture. But 10 of the 12 felt seriously hurt or betrayed. Six of those 10 said you had acted “like a sell-out” and have stopped supporting you altogether.

I wanted to make sure this wasn’t just a Pakistan chip-on-shoulder about India. So I wrote to a Kiwi friend who is a Roger die-hard. And an All-Black fanatic, obviously. I asked how he would feel if you were to publicly support Australia over the All-Blacks in the Rugby World Cup. Immediately he responded:

“I’d be hurt and upset. Pissed off as well.”

This got me thinking. Suppose India’s acrimonious cricket rivals had been China instead of Pakistan.  Would you or your sponsors have endorsed a public show of support for India over China? Of course not! It would have been brand suicide! The publicity gain in India would not have been worth the cost.

Worth the cost.

At its essence therefore, this public display of support for India represents a ruthless valuation of your Pakistani fans, based on their economic and brand impact. Effectively, you are saying that our feelings and opinions are acceptable collateral damage for publicity in India.  That we are expendable, in a way that fans from a larger country wouldn’t be.

And the truth is, in tennis economic terms, compared to Indian fans, we Pakistani fans are indeed expendable. But hearing that truth spelled out publicly, and almost directly, by you, hurts like hell.

So, where does this leave us?

It’s widely known you are humble, kind and sensitive to a fault. I suspect that if this letter reaches you, you may wish to make amends. I hope you find a way. I’m sure a positive gesture about Pakistan will win you back many of the people whom this picture alienated.

Sadly, I won’t be one of them. I was in too deep. So this morning I deleted over a hundred Roger posts from my Facebook wall as well as the photo collection I had painstakingly put together. I also donated my RF cap and my collection of books about you.

I will always respect you, love your game and wish you success. I just won’t be along with you for the ride.

Sincerely yours,

Sulaiman Ijaz

Sulaiman Ijaz

Sulaiman Ijaz

The writer is a Phd student in Economics at the University of Cambridge. He is researching the education of young children in developing countries. Previously, he was a consultant with McKinsey & Company.

The views expressed by the writer and the reader comments do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of The Express Tribune.

  • Nandita.

    Hain?
    Someone has got a lot of growing up to do.Recommend

  • Cosmo

    What da duck!!
    Get over it man.Recommend

  • syed indian

    what are you trying to say? if whole of Pakistan thinks like you, you are in grave danger. It is their personal choice (even though economics are involved). It is like an younger brother crying for attention when his elder brother is praised. why should India and Pakistan be linked to everything under the sun? either accept that you have a common thread with Indians or just focus on your country and don’t even bother who supports India. grow up. just curious, would this article be still written from a Pakistani if Federer had a Pakistani shirt. Recommend

  • Queen

    Sad to say, I WAS a Federer fan.Recommend

  • wb

    A good blog.

    You’re right. It’s perhaps, more about economics than anything else.Recommend

  • Adnan

    It would be easy to criticise you for this if I read only the first half of the letter or I didn’t give its details the attention they needed. Your point is clear and I hope people don’t misinterpret the message which is what i fear is already happening from some of the posts below. It’s simple. The essence of this article is the paragraph which starts with “and the truth is…”. Spoken from the heart. Great read. Send it to Roger Federer. Recommend

  • Consultant

    Dude, your analysis of linking economies of scale of likes with bleeding blue is very weak and completely off track. Incentive theory (tennis economics) is absolutely the wrong framework to use in analyzing this story. Presentation = good, analysis = weak, argument = pointless. Case, total fail!!Recommend

  • Jor El

    Oh come one man … Rafael Nadal is a self confessed “greatest Real Madrid fan” …
    Yet hes my fav tennis player(am a die-hard barca fan since ’96) … its his choice, y does it have to be “either india or pakistan” … sure, he may have economic interests at heart(or he’s genuinely impressed by india), its his wish … but to moan over an issue as petty is this, not to put too fine a point on it, is pathetic …Recommend

  • Jor El

    So, if am not wrong, what u r saying is that u were a FedEx fan becoz of his tennis playing abilities, but becoz of his support to someone u consider a rival(not becoz another guy came along playing better tennis or FedEx stopped playing gud tennis), u r no longer a fan ???Recommend

  • Noman Ansari

    Honestly, Roger, you can support who you want man. You are a tremendous player and if you want to pick a team, it’s OK.

    Please don’t consider this whiny blog to be a representation of Pakistanis. We aren’t hyper sensitive.

    I am quite shocked this embarrassing piece was published.

    Honestly, the best response is to send Rafa a Pakistan t-shirt and that’s it. Seriously hope Roger doesn’t read the blog, or if he does, he realizes it doesn’t represent actual Pakistan cricket fans.

    Roger you don’t have to make amends because you didn’t do any damage.Recommend

  • Cosmo

    This article is clear indication is that Pakistanis suffer from identity crises. They see everything through the Indian prism. I wonder if this article would still be written if Roger were to support a country other than India.Recommend

  • Noman Ansari

    “(Of course like any red-blooded Pakistani, I would want to change
    your mind by telling you about the invention, magic and genius that
    characterise our cricket. Not to mention our 72-50 lead over India in all matches.)

    But no, I’m not upset that you chose to support India over Pakistan. I’m upset that you chose to support India over Pakistan, publicly. This made it seem like your Pakistani fans are expendable.”

    Seriously dude. Why. Would you say this? Who. Cares.Recommend

  • Noman Ansari

    “Inevitably though, in Pakistan it had the opposite effect. After you
    posted the picture, I did an informal poll of the dozen biggest
    Pakistani Roger fans I know. All very serious fans, mind you. Two of
    them were not bothered by the picture. But 10 of the 12 felt seriously
    hurt or betrayed. Six of those 10 said you had acted “like a sell-out”
    and have stopped supporting you altogether.”

    Nothing like scientific polls to back your claim.

    Also, who the hell surveys their friends for this?Recommend

  • Noman Ansari

    “Sadly, I won’t be one of them. I was in too deep. So this morning I
    deleted over a hundred Roger posts from my Facebook wall as well as the
    photo collection I had painstakingly put together. I also donated my RF
    cap and my collection of books about you.”

    Please also delete your passport and go to another country. Like hypersensitivitistan.Recommend

  • allyson

    Geez! All I can say is that men really are immature when it comes to sports…Recommend

  • Anon

    Put this question to Pakistani “tatzianigaar” and they will say all because “India ki markeet bahut badi hai.”Recommend

  • Noman Ansari

    “Your relationship with Mirka became,
    and remains, an inspiration for my wife and me. Without my wife’s
    support I could never have overcome the difficult times in our five
    years together. So we just love, love, love the fact that Mirka has been
    the difference between you becoming The Greatest, and you remaining in
    the pack of men you surpassed.”

    The difficult times are just beginning it seems.Recommend

  • Noman Ansari

    “I will always respect you, love your game and wish you success. I just won’t be along with you for the ride.”

    Considering that he’s about to retire, that’s not saying much, is it?Recommend

  • Rashid Ahmedkutty, Kerala, Ind

    Don’t you think before “researching on the education of young children in developing countries” you must grow to be an adult… ?Recommend

  • Custard_Pie_In_Your_Face

    I’m sure Federer must be burning his Indian cricket team shirt as he’s reading this.Recommend

  • James

    Looks like another graduate from “Zaid Hamid” school of thought……..Recommend

  • glassyman

    Christ….. you people being cry babyRecommend

  • Nur

    Don’t understand why you should have a problem with Federer saying Bleed Blue, as long as he didn’t say Pakistan sucks or something? I mean seriously, you basically have a problem with Federer holding up an Indian jersey. Pakistan doesn’t even come in the picture.

    Not that this excuses your silliness, but the reason he did this is cause of Nike, for whom he is a brand ambassador. I doubt he cares much for cricket otherwise. Recommend

  • NJ Dough

    wow, I was surprised by a PhD student has this kind of thinking and attitude.Recommend

  • hari naidu

    its now 51-72Recommend

  • Faraz Talat

    Umm…yeah, I’m a Pakistani and I have no issues with Federer supporting India publicly. He’s not a human-Switzerland. He’s allowed to take sides in sports.
    Recommend

  • man

    you little fairy ….did he hurt your feelings ?! :(Recommend

  • Mobin Asghar

    Excellent emotional write-up. Bravo!

    Look forward for more write up’s from you. Interesting to read crying neighbours.Recommend

  • Taha Khizer

    Get over it, Plastic fan -_-

    Its okay for him to show his support, I cant blame Roger. He has visited India twice, played there, loves the traditions, has more fan following. Yes, Federer should never have posted this publicly and that too on such a controversial day. But that doesnt mean you start judging him. That Indian kit and Federer are both sponsored by Nike. What if it was just a coalition? Also this doesnt mean he is against Pakistan. He would like to visit Islamabad according to his interviews to Geo News. So stop complaining about it, we dont need fans like you -_-Recommend

  • Nandita.

    Et… my conment??? Gayab as usual. Recommend

  • someone

    Going by your logic, you won’t be left with much friends in the world since most countries and people know and support India over Pakistan.By the way, are you nor friends with China as well since they are supporting India for NSG and UNSC?Recommend

  • Muhammad Arslan khan

    If It was gift that was given by someone. Now what he should do??Recommend

  • Kramer

    Guys, this is probably a satire. Stay cool!Recommend

  • Eesha

    But I still am a loyal Roger fan. I don’t get it what’s the big deal. He didn’t support his mother’s home country either..probably just received the shirt on a more sentiment high fixture of the WC and just had to post an appropriate post :DRecommend

  • Sajaad

    Obama, xi ping, putin, banki moon, mars- delete all of them frm ur “system”Recommend

  • Sam

    Actually hes right,fine he supports india but to post a picture on the day of the big match is kind of insensitive..even if he supported Pakistan i would think itd be unfair..Recommend

  • abhi

    This is really pathetic blog. He has just supported an sporting team and you are already fuming. He didn’t say anything against Pakistan.Recommend

  • Sanjeev

    Pls dont- what would federer do now? Gardening? Pls dont be so harsh on him- and what abt putin, obama, xi ping etc etxRecommend

  • hemanth kumar

    how does it even matter, would it bother you if he had supported southafrica . I dont think so , the problem is its india. I think so the problem is with your narrow minded thinking. Its a sport see it as one, lets not do politics with it. If British had never ruled us i dont think so this pakistan india issue would have even existed. Lets remove our political blinkers. Its time for it.Recommend

  • Krats

    You are totes awesome. <3 from IndiaRecommend

  • http://www3.cs.stonybrook.edu/~hsarkar/ Hirak Sarkar

    I have a question would you have posted this, if the game was played between Pakistan and China ?Recommend

  • sourabh sharma

    Hundreds of times significant people have sided with China… But meh I/we don’t care. Recommend

  • Aashish Biswas

    Honestly I don’t know what to say….but I think it’s ok for someone to take sides, I mean he is a human being he can take sides. If he hadn’t been supporting India and instead he would have shown support for Australia or South Africa it wouldn’t have hurt the sentiments of Pakistani fans but just because he supported India publicly it hurted Pakistani sentiments. Yes I’m an Indian but I’m appealing to both Pakistanis & Indians it’s just a sport take it in that spirit it’s not a war yaar, we both are same people and have same family values. I would also request my brothers to think on one more aspect if it would had been a hockey match it wouldn’t had mattered that much on the fact that Roger Fedrer is supporting Indian hockey team & not Pakistani Team. I think we both should not bring this hatred in the game of sport after all winning a game against India doesn’t matter that much comparison to winning the tournament like wise it should be for Indians as well winning the World Cup matters not the win against Pakistan. In hope of friendship & peace.Recommend

  • PakKaPapa

    Yeah, as if he cares about fans in Pakistan. You could have written an open letter to the Talibanis, ISI or the Pakistan Army. What a waste of space, time and words.Recommend

  • brcm

    hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha*takes a breath* hahahahahahahahahahahahaRecommend

  • Shabbir

    Noman, you should become a roast-master. It would be a dangerous job in the hypersensitivity sub-continent, but you would make the saner people laugh a lot!Recommend

  • Surya Samaddar

    Why don’t Pakis understand that the whole world (penguins of antarctica included) doesn’t give even half a crap to the petty egos and nonsensical emotionalities of Pakistanis. Despite all downs, India has a face value in the world-It is the home of exotic orient and mysticism. Pakistan started its artificial identity as “not India” and after 68 years, if you list down the things the Pakistan is known for, throughout the world , then one would easily find out why barring humanitarian causes nobody wishes to associate himself with Pak.

    I know some wierdo Paki will come up with a reply to this post with lots of “what about your poverty”, “:what about your rapes”, “what about your this and that”

    Bhai! despite all this crap, India is known in the world as a civilized country and Pakistan as terrorist university of the world. This is the “name and fame” you have earned your country in the past 68 years. So be a realist and stop whining.Recommend

  • Abhishek Mishra

    So sad to see a well read person like you taking such a stance. Well the cricket rivalry between India and Pakistan is only media driven. Its just a game where 11 players from each side play 50 overs a side. Well tell you the truth. 50 over game is a dying breed. Don’t waste time over analyzing this. Have fun in life and ensure u leave this Earth in a better place then you inherited it in.Recommend

  • Neeraj Chauhan

    Dude seriously you have issues. Its such a small thing that could have dealt with ease of mind but you’ve made this article so negative as if fed has made a big crime and is guilty to be charged with excluding fans of him. 1 in 500 pakistani-fed fans wouldn’t even give a second thought over the matter. Take my advice, start uploading the photos back :-pRecommend

  • Smart

    [Nike Employee] Guys he is a Nike ambassador and India is a Nike sponsored team …it is REALLY SO SIMPLE :)Recommend

  • Smart

    [Nike Employee] Guys he is a Nike ambassador and India is a Nike sponsored team …it is REALLY SO SIMPLE :)Recommend

  • Noman Ansari

    No mate. Most of us have other things to worry about.Recommend

  • fakenewsreader

    kiddishRecommend

  • Prithwi D

    Man… these guys … obsessed with India … get over it— most likely it is for commercial reasons (sponsors)… Federer can care less about Cricket .. !!Recommend

  • Chulbul Pandey

    Ha ha! Gussa thook do, mere dost. Have some mercy on the author :DRecommend

  • http://geekinkuwait.blogspot.com/ Abhishek Kumar
  • MoYo’s Daadi

    Munna, chill maar. Thoda sprite peele.Recommend

  • Cosmo

    I seriously hope for that and want to believe that Mr.Ijaz is an odd one out . My sincere request to Pakistanis is to not feel insecure because of India’s rise OR glee over India’s failure.Recommend

  • Sid

    This article summarizes how dead is the feeling of “sportsmanship” in Pakistan. That your ego and pride depends on others validating you vs establishing your pride on your self achievement and introspection. You do not need others to validate or invalidate what you are.
    Stop feeling entitled to everything dear Pakistanis. Status is earned, respect is earned, never begged. Every time you ask others to give you same parity as India it only takes away yet another chunk of whatever (if any) respect is left of you.Recommend

  • Sid

    I posted my comment in haste and immediate burst of emotion. You will see it if it gets published. I, like Mr. / Ms Cosmo here above invariably generalized that Pakistanis lack sportsmanship solely going by this writeup. And its sad I submit myself to such quick emotional burst when my half family is Pakistani and have many Pakistani friends who are far wiser and amazing then what the media loves to portray.
    Reading the comment by Cosmo suddenly gave me sense of guilt and reminder not to generalize.
    I sincerely wish that India and Pakistan plays again in this world cup in semis or finals. Enjoy the cricket season. CheersRecommend

  • Rohit

    Sooper broRecommend

  • mmoa

    I read this stupid letter and all I can think is….. good riddance. all the better. The blog would be a good comedy piece, were it not serious.Recommend

  • Rangdeghanti

    I support you Soleman – please delete everything related to everything everyone likes about the color blue or remotely Indian and OH!, ,stop watching Indian movies and tell that to everyone in PakistanRecommend

  • NJ Dough

    where is my post?Recommend

  • what_the_?

    get a life! I can’t believe this amateurish blog is published. I would suggest you to hold the blue jersey & support #bleedblue, probably you wouldn’t feel that bad then. People just don’t have enough work in their life, and get time to write this dump of stinky stuff…Recommend

  • Cynthia

    I am a die-hard Fed fan but the blogger’s point is valid. It was rather insensitive of Fed to publicly post the photo right before a huge match between teams that have such a long and deeply entrenched rivalry. But as many posters have pointed out, Fed is a Nike ambassador and India is a Nike-sponsored team. Most likely that
    explains the public posting.

    I am however dismayed by the vitriolic and personal attacks against the blogger. Attacking someone for expressing an honest opinion that is not in any way mean-spirited constitutes bullying. And anonymous bullying is rather cowardly, don’t you think?Recommend

  • XY

    “The writer is a Phd student in Economics at the University of Cambridge”Recommend

  • Vilander

    This article proves the below, when the issue involves India even a Pakistani with Phd from Cambridge behaves like a child.Recommend

  • Vilander

    He supported India for a paid campaign, its got to do with India and RF where does pak come into this ?Recommend

  • Vilander

    Why is everything about India mutually exclusive for Pak people ? tit for tat, you get USA visit we get China visit, you get civil nuke deal we get same, you get UNSC seat assurance we cry a river and act like a despondent child.Recommend

  • http://people.ign.com/ripxo AlphA RipXo

    It’s their personal choice. Plus where the heavy endorsements are,they choose that side.
    Get over it,it’s not like he was a Pakistani by descent and still chose India.Recommend

  • Andy

    Wow ! Sorry to say but I guess you were never a fan of him. A true fan will stick to his legend in all ups and downs, your mentality is like a failed politician who keep changing parties shamelessly.Recommend

  • NannaDesha

    Get over it. People in Pakistan and India have better things to worry about. You are doing a PhD program? Gosh.. Recommend

  • Rakib

    Sulaiman Ijaz, one day in future, older & wiser, you will feel rather embarrassed for having written this.Recommend

  • observer

    Hmmmm… focus on truly important issues and prioritize his time. I am surprised he made it to the University of Cambridge.Recommend

  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dosa Dosa Man

    The comments in this article better represent the Pakistanis than your whiny opinion about a tennis legend and his choice of cricket teams. I’m sure if the Pakistan Cricket Team was sponsored by NIKE, he might have done the same for you guys do. Hell, he would have worn both those shirts together.

    You seem to be well educated my friend, but damn your article Recommend

  • luuke

    What ?Recommend

  • luuuuke

    Whaaaaa Whaaaaaa Whaaaaaa………So let’s get this straight…..Pakistani fans are upset that a winner Federer supports a winning side…A side that has thumped Pakistan 6-0 in the World Cup since 1992…..Surprise surprise….Recommend

  • Nadal

    Hilarious brah…Recommend

  • Rohan

    Just goes to show that even the so called liberal western eeducated Pakistanis are so talibanized and hate India/Hindus, there’s no hope for PakistanisRecommend

  • Sagar Subhedar

    Dear Master Sulaiman Ijaz, (could have written “Mr.”

    How about you, who betrayed your mother way back in 2006 when she asked you to support Rafa and a fellow like you supported Roger!! This means you have no love for your mother and totally like to disrespect her feelings. .
    #GrowUp #SarcasmRecommend

  • Noman Ansari

    Seriously. No one cares. Good for India etc. but we have our own lives to manage. :)Recommend

  • SamSal

    And exactly why should he explain his personal matters to you?
    He has the right to support whichever team in whatever sport he likes!!Recommend

  • Faraz Talat

    That is a refreshingly mature comment to find here. Thank you.

    You’re right. The article, in all its pettiness, does not speak for all Pakistanis.Recommend

  • Farhan

    Wow. He supports Arsenal in football, so should all the fans of Manchester United or Chelsea stop supporting him. He is allowed to choose sides, grow up!Recommend

  • Abba zak

    By the he authors logic, Indians shouldn’t drink a soft drink that sponsors Pakistan cricket team. Fact is, India is the biggest (one of the) market for the soft drink which sponsors Pakistan cricket team. Maturity is the need of the hour. Thank you for writing on how a Pakistani (educated) thinks.Recommend

  • Rishi

    Awww… All these comments so harsh on the poor chap. Btw, if you are on a donation spree, I would love to have RF’s stuff. Please send it over this side of border.. :D.Recommend

  • malala

    Hey, get out of Pakistan because it was called as india(pre-partition). Recommend

  • Kumar

    Hope you will be leaving soon for Papua/New Guinea
    To practice medicine. They need doctors there badly.Recommend

  • Kumar

    Freedom of expression. Nobody forced you to read this blog.
    Doubt you will be able get a visa for Tanganyika. Try Mogadishu.
    No need to be nasty.Recommend

  • Kumar

    This blog seems to have effected you severely. For some reason.
    Envy?Recommend

  • Kumar

    No you have no issues. You just write frivolous blogs about
    Michelle Obama’s clothes, her fashion sense, her hair style.
    her shoes, her pants, her scarves,…
    You are deeply ‘took’ by her.Recommend

  • Ali

    ‪#‎BleedingBlue‬ has economies of scale associated with this marketing stunt. It’s not the oomph factor of Indian entertainment industry that pulls stars like ‪#‎Federer‬ but the amount of money the ‪#‎Indian‬ economy coughs. Instead of being concerned who is bleeding what, in the land of pure, ‪#‎BleedingRed‬ must come to a halt.Recommend

  • Hira

    I thought a 16 year old had written the article until I read your description. Dude, he’s a human being. This is his choice! I was a little sad that he didn’t choose to support Pakistan instead, but seriously at this point our team should just be glad that their own country is supporting them! He’s not a Pakistani nor an Indian so it’s completely up to him which country he wants to support without it being a breach of patriotism!Recommend

  • hira

    Hopefully donated to someone who would be able to appreciate talent without judging every move of theirs!Recommend

  • economic juice

    Yes and if one of the biggest market starts boycotting the soft drink, what would the soft drink company do? Would it still sponsor a team where the market is much smaller comparatively? Or would it stop sponsoring the smaller market cricket team? Economics, author, economics. By boycotting or banning, it would hurt everyone, even if you think it is not related to you or your country. When economics are involved, country, religion, likes and dislikes get erased. Recommend

  • peter griffin

    Why did you say it. Now Pakistanis like the author will never buy Nike.Recommend

  • propakistani

    Hey Indians boycott Pepsi if you can.Recommend

  • goodbye sanity

    What was controversial? It was just a cricket match. You people are treating it in some way that only blogs like these can describe. Even if we had lost, things would be normal. Don’t you play sports? Winning and loosing are part of a game. Have we banned Pepsi for loosing to Pakistan 72 times. I will tell you a simple solution. Whenever and wherever federer plays, you guys can go over there and support his opponent vehemently. If this is the measure of patriotism, long live Pakistan and may sanity rest in peace.Recommend

  • MQ

    What a brilliant piece. Spot on. Thanks but no thanks Mr. Federer. Recommend