Is a ‘science student’ smarter than an ‘arts student’?

Published: September 11, 2013

Science and arts/humanities both have their own significances and should be given their due importance to keep a balance in societies.

As soon as we step into the dreaded phase of our education where we must choose which subjects we want to pursue for our higher studies, arts and science are pretty much the basic options to choose from and these practically shape our academic future.

I remember when I passed the eighth grade, I was content because I had been able to achieve the target score required to be able to choose science for my matriculation; I was ecstatic, my interest in science being secondary. It wasn’t just me, all my class fellows worked hard so that they could be promoted to the ‘science’ section of grade nine. The ones who made the merit joined the science group while others were left with the insular option of taking arts.

That was the standard then, but students now make their subject choices according to their future vocations.

The point is that the students of yesteryear would never choose their subjects out of their own personal interests but were part of a race of being tagged as an intelligent student. The ones studying science were always considered exceptionally bright students while others were not. Such a mind-set has prevailed in our society, both in general and for students in particular.

It is not the students’ fault because they develop these attitudes according to what they observe and are told. There are a few exceptions (some private institutes) that groom students into discovering and pursuing their own interests, but majority of our schools fail to do so.

The reasons could be multifarious; maybe the teachers fail to instil in students an understanding of the importance of various subjects or maybe it’s the confusing merit-based system that barricades students from making the right choices.

Another reason is that in our part of the world, people are considered ‘successful’ if only they are doctors and engineers – a stereotype we are known well for. These are the top two ‘respectable’ professions for high achievers.

It is a widely accepted belief that getting an education in science makes one intelligent and enables one to acquire a degree which is not only valued by society but also leads to a highly-paid occupation. No wonder, nowadays people give considerable importance to the degree one holds even while choosing a life partner – as if an academic degree totally guarantees a happy marital life!

The problem is that in pursuit of certain superficial goals, we tend to undermine our personal choices. It starts happening from the very beginning when we take the first step towards choosing an academic path. Initially, it is the social pressure that plays its role and later, it develops into a tunnel vision effectIn this whole perplexity, individuals totally ignore the fact that not all minds are meant to work well in the fields of science.

People do wonders even in the areas of arts and humanities which in itself hold a huge treasure chest of knowledge. Science education opens doors in the fields of medicine, architecture, engineering, healthcare, technology and quantitative analysis, while arts and humanities offer a wide range of career prospects in social and civil service, academia, media, fine arts, tourism, linguistics and other similar areas. Nowadays, it all depends on what field you want to major in and potentially pursue as a career option.

We must rid ourselves of the notion that science is the only domain for intellectuals. Such an outlook is the main reason why students are so unwilling to consider taking arts subjects in the first place. Children need to be encouraged to pursue their education according to their interests; this will ensure that they are happy with the career choice they have made. It can also help lower the “ratta” (rote learning) or cram-culture, since cramming is mostly practised when one is unable to grasp a concept and forcefully stuffs the mind with those alienated theories that are not understandable altogether.

As a society, we should realise that to pursue a career in one’s area of choice is something that eventually leads to success in professional life. Work doesn’t become a burden then, and life becomes more enjoyable. Even businesses today make sure that professional goals of their employees are in line with company’s goals, which means that firms want employees to take pleasure in their work while they fulfil their duties. They realise that promoting such a culture is crucial to boost creativity, leading to productivity and revenues. The same idea works in all professions.

Science and arts/humanities both have their own significances and should be given their due importance to keep a balance in societies. Where the former focuses on developing technical skills, the latter enhances soft skills among individuals. None can take the place of the other and both will continue to contribute positively towards progression of economies. It’s high time we abandon the science-dominated mentality which has been restricting our minds to focus on a larger and more fulfilling perspective.

“At the end of the day, art and science are united by one logic and one impulse—both are attempts to understand what it is to be human and the world around us.”

— Keith Tyson

Kiran Wali

Kiran Wali

A business graduate working in the corporate sector. She tweets @KiranW_ (twitter.com/KiranW_)

The views expressed by the writer and the reader comments do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of The Express Tribune.

  • Indi

    Nice article.
    But isn’t this a topic from the 80’s …I think most parents are over and done with the doctor/engineer mindset.
    Though I studied medicine(purely out of interest-not parental pressure),my classmates, who branched away from the maths & science subjects in high school are doing exceptionally well today in thriving careers.Recommend

  • Dr.N

    Nice article.
    But isn’t this a topic from the 80’s …I think most parents are over and done with the doctor/engineer mindset.
    Though I studied medicine(purely out of interest-not parental pressure),my classmates, who branched away from the maths & science subjects in high school are doing exceptionally well today in thriving careers both in India & abroad.Recommend

  • Prospective Doctor

    Yes, us science students are much smarter than Art students, because we have to study A LOT more, and have to work 4 times as hard as an Art student to get the same grade, we also reap the benefits after we’re done with our studies,whereas Art students may have it easy during their college years but after they graduate they have very few opportunities.

    The average doctor has an IQ of 115, whereas the average Art student has an IQ of around 99.Recommend

  • Sajid

    We must rid ourselves of the notion that science is the only domain for intellectuals. Such an outlook is the main reason why students are so unwilling to consider taking arts subjects in the first place.

    While the subjects of Arts and Sciences may require similar amount of hard work to excel, the students who join the sciences group are generally smarter than those found in the arts department. And this has been decided by the job market (not a societal prejudice or ‘notion’), there are simply more/better work oppertunities for science gradutes hence that is where the best students go. Recommend

  • BlackJack

    It is a widely accepted belief that getting an education in science makes one intelligent and enables one to acquire a degree which is not only valued by society but also leads to a highly-paid occupation.
    It think the issue is less of intelligence than the likelihood of financial success, and has decreased with time – today’s parents are not perturbed by academic choices that would have raised eyebrows even a generation or two earlier. Of course, during those days, when opportunities were few and competition was fierce, it was assumed that someone who succeeded in getting into Medicine or select Engineering courses was indeed smart and hardworking; however I don’t recall any such assumptions at high school level, or even at degree level (a regular Bachelors in Science student isn’t/ wasn’t seen to be particularly smarter than a Commerce grad, for example – quite the opposite; it was often assumed, most unfairly, that he/ she didn’t get into a B.E/ B. Tech/ MBBS course and was forced to do a vanilla degree).Recommend

  • Hindu Indian

    @Prospective Doctor:
    Nice Article :D Recommend

  • http://www.twitter.com/BajiPlease Baji Please

    Is a ‘science student’ smarter than an ‘arts student’? –> Yes, in most of the cases. However, science students need to stop being condescending and art students need to stop underestimating themselves and be explicit about it.Recommend

  • Fareeha

    Dear Prospective ‘Doctor’. If you had to study a LOT harder then it may be you didn’t understand the material in the first place. I wasn’t an Arts student in college but I did exceptionally well in University in the Arts Department. And TRUST me…our noses were as flat from the proverbial grindstone as those who opted for science subjects.

    End result? I am proud to say that I am now an editor and Senior Manager at a successful company while those who WILLINGLY accepted science are equally happy and prosperous in their own fields. There are way more opportunities today than they were 10 years back! All one has to do is look for them. Opportunities don’t come knocking..they have to be ferreted out.

    As for ‘intelligence’ IQ only determines how technical one is. That’s all. It in no way determines how you end up living your life or the choices you ultimately make. Saying one is smarter than someone else only proves the tunnel vision theory. I know several amazing doctors and engineers who are extremely happy in their professions and you know what? none of them ever try to compare themselves to others based on ‘IQ’. They are happy with their choice just as Arts, Commerce, Humanities students are content in their’s. Recommend

  • Sane

    Student of Social Sciences have a vast canvas of study. Their subjects are varied and cover ground realities which is faced by everyone. They have more depth and brilliance in pinpointing common life problems and issues and its resolution.

    While science students have a very limited area of study. Consequently they are less capable in facing daily life problems. Generally science students have very limited knowledge in other subjects and global issues.Recommend

  • Nandita.

    I haven’t read the blog but did read the authors bio which is amusing — ‘A business graduate with distinction throughout academics’

    Waise, getting distinction is great but it is no big deal really … don’t go around describing yourself in this fashion.. it’s leaves a bad impression..

    Dr N / Indi : Disagree with your comment. Parents in India are so NOT done with the engineer / doctor mindset … Which part of India are you from ? Recommend

  • Ch. Allah Daad

    In Pakistan, Science students take extra classes, spend lots of money on Tuitions, mostly memorize the subject and get good marks. In reality very few know the subject. I asked a question from an electrical engineering student (A plus student) about Hubble Telescope. He had never heard about. On the other hand Arts students bunk their classes, spend time in Awara Gardi, develop lots of connections which help them in the long run.Recommend

  • http://facebook anum siddiqui

    @Prospective Doctor:
    I think before making any judmental comments regarding anything, it is very important to walk a mile on that person’s shoe. As for grades, I don’t think it could define anyone’s intelligence-even the art students. Those who work hard and stay focused are always the ones who reap benefits later, NO MATTER whatever field they’ve chosen.

    As for IQ level averages please tell us what statistics are you refering to.

    I totally agree with the writer, becoming a doctor or an engineer doesn’t guarantee your success in life, it’s what gives you pleasure that enables you to do wonders. Recommend

  • gp65

    @Author: In Western countries your advice would be absolutely on target because a certain minimum standard of living can be maintained even without professional qualification. I do not know about what type of options are available in Pakistan that a kid can pursue that give a high probablity of supporting a decent standard of living but in India it would definitely be the commerce or science stream. So it is not that going to science makes a kid bright but the reverse, the bright kids go to science /commerce because they can. YEs of course there are exceptions where someone is extremely succesful despite not following the beaten path but examples of people who followed their passion and deeply regretted when they reached mid-life. Back home, switching careers mid-life is not that easy, nor going back to school that easy. So early life choices are important.

    @Indi: In the 80s this was an issue because therer were very few professions that assured one of a good standard of living – Doctor, Engineer, CA, MBA and of course the civil services. So it is understandable that parents would push the kids towards those subjects. Even now these tend to be the choices of most parents for their sons – who it is assumed will support their families but the entrance to engineering and medicine colleges are no longer the nightmare that they once used to be because so many colleges have now opened up. OF course entertainment industry has expanded dramatically and there are many professions other than the traditional ones that allow you to support a good lifestyle.Recommend

  • binger

    but it’s the universal truth that the arts students are much more prettier and sexier than the science studentsRecommend

  • Four

    I think it’s more important that both art and science students have exposure to the others field. We should adopt the liberal arts style system of education, like in the US, in our universities. That way each and every student receives a balanced education. Studying science only for four years robs a person of intellect! Recommend

  • Hassan J

    @Prospective Doctor:

    ”The average doctor has an IQ of 115, whereas the average Art student has an IQ of around 99.”

    Who said that?

    Intelligence is a relative term,there is no single definition for it and IQ is no definitive measure for one’s intelligence either.Its just a test, in which any person can get a 150 plus score with a few tricks and practice.The IQ test was originally devised only to distinguish between slow learners affected by a neurological disease and normal learners.So stop believing in this IQ crap.

    Second,studying science does not increase your IQ.Of course,It makes your thinking style more analytical and skeptical, but this alone does not prove that you are in any way smarter than an art graduate.

    In fact excelling in an art requires a lot more creativity and practice than in the sciences; where one develops a hardwired analytical mindset that one reuses in math,physics and chemistry without changing.Art requires you to think out of the box,to create something out of nothing and to observe deeply for patterns.

    I am an electrical engineer myself and I believe that one can not judge a person’s intelligence by the courses he took in college.So we should stop from comparisons of the sort :Einstein vs Beethoven etc.Each one was a genius in his own way.Recommend

  • Singh

    Kiran Wali or Kiran Walia.Recommend

  • Go Zardari Go!!

    If arts students and even some science majors can quit complaining that they can’t find a job in philosophy or whatever that would be great. Personally, one may have great desires to do something in arts or what not but if there is no job market for it then it could be the bad decision. Choose a field that will pay you at the end, and then go for your dreams. You always need something to fall back on if it doesn’t work out the way you hoped.Recommend

  • Asad Khan

    The problem with Arts students is not their IQ, it is their Degrees. How can a person be entitled to Master of Art when he just completed the high school and no nothing about the ode of practicality.

    Can a lonely black belt become an Icon like Bruce Lee by just completed the basics Martial Arts of 5 years, or a Student of a painting school can parallel Picasso by just having a MA degree????

    However with Science graduate there is no such parallels, they study, they applied, they research, they doctorate, and finally they eventually called Genius or Inventors (i.e Einstein, Edison)

    regards,Recommend

  • Dr Dang

    How can Indi & Dr.N have same comments ?Recommend

  • I am a Khan

    @Prospective Doctor:
    Chartered Accountants, Actuaries are as intelligent if not more intelligent than Doctors or Engineers. So you cannot stereotype all non science students as not being sharp. I have honestly seen some very hopeless students becoming Doctors with the advent of private universities.Recommend

  • Eemaan Yusufzai

    @Prospective Doctor: As an engineering student with an engineer father and a doctor mother, I disagree. Science/engineering/medicine students from Pak (not from Canada however, as the system of acceptance for them is NOT solely based on merit) tend to have zero managerial, communication, leadership, and many other useful traits. Also, a lot of doctors here (in Canada, where I live) — esp. of Pak descent — are simply former arts students who changed their minds.

    You’re confusing ‘making a lot of money’ with having real-life skills. Being-book smart vs. world-smart are two different things (although there are some few people who do both; only those people can in a sense be considered ‘smarter’ than everyone else).

    In our family, some people chose medicine (about a third), some engineering (about 40%) and the remainder did what they wanted (incl. Islamia studies).

    In conclusion, i disagree that those arts people are ‘dumber’, but i do acknowledge that the academic load (even though it’s not the sole determiner of intelligence) is higher for medicine and engineering. Recommend

  • Muziqmonk

    It all boils down to our national attitude towards art and culture. For us a painter or a poet is a lesser being compared to a doctor or an engineer, because for us someone who was unable to enter a “science” college or university is just not smart enough, regardless of the fact that painters and poets have to use actual brain cells to be creative and not rely solely on rote learning. We have no respect for our singers and musicians. While we love listening to them and attend their concerts by the hordes, in our hearts we consider them low lifes with epithets like “bhand”, “mirasi” etc. In short, our “educated” class is the most illiterate in the world. Recommend

  • bangash

    @Prospective Doctor
    And what scientific study do you base your average IQ claims on ? Arts/Science choice in FA/FSc is a foolish design in Pakistani education system. A country needs a lot more people than just doctors and engineers in order to thrive.Recommend

  • Rashid

    An interesting question which has tormented inquiring minds for ages. While as a student I used to think science students (being one of them myself) are a few notch higher than their friends from the faculty of arts in grey matters, I do not anymore believe in such juvenile fantasies. While most science students languish in very mundane employments, most of the greatest thinker, philosophers came from a non-science background. In other words, original thinking is not a monopoly of either the science, or the arts student.Recommend

  • Ali Baloch

    @Prospective Doctor:
    I doubt it!!! I’m an arts student and trust me Arts is not easy as it seems, the human body has the same organs and bones since it’s creation where as Sociology, Politics, Economics, and History are for ever evolving, as far as IQ is concerned, even with your iq of “115” I doubt you can speak 22 different languages, a feat which I have mastered with my measly iq of “99”.Recommend

  • Parvez

    If you like what you do and it gives you satisfaction it matters not if its in the science or the arts fields, because once you are good at what you do, you will progress.
    The bacha try to become a doctor or an engineer …………is a bit dated.

    The comment by @Prospective Doctor looks like its been written by an Arts student who wants to have his / her pompus doctor buddy clobbered. The working of an artistic mind………….priceless.
    Recommend

  • abc

    people who are smart in one area can be really dumb in the other, there are a very few people in this world who are smart in everything… i for example am an engineer myself, though i dont consider myself a smart one, but i did really well in school/uni, if were in arts I wouldve failed miserably. i suck at creativity and writing etc i wish i had all these artsy skills, i think people are born with it ….Recommend

  • Rabeea

    @Prospective Doctor:
    1) Generalization much??? If a person is talented and hardworking, he will be successful in his field regardless of his profession.

    2) And where did you come up with these statistics? Or did you just imagined them with the help of your superior IQ?Recommend

  • Rabeea

    @Indi:
    I’ve worked for a while as a school psychologist, and from what I’ve learnt while interacting with teachers, students and their parents during that time, unfortunately this mindset is still present in our
    society. Especially in middle class families.Recommend

  • Nina

    Good points! We really need to encourage our children to study whatever they are interested in. The main objective should be to let them seek education. Science or Humanities should never be an issue. It’s true that our society tends to give more value to the science education. By doing so, we in a way are wrongfully discouraging the other group of students. This thing is not going to work for an under-developed country like ours where a lot still needs to be done when it comes to education. Recommend

  • Nina

    @Prospective Doctor:
    Maybe you are living in the old times still. As per the latest developments, EQ has become much more valuable than IQ !!Recommend

  • karchiite

    I know a lot of people from arts group earning more than any doctor can think of in his life in one month (so your statement about better paying jobs is baseless it is the mind which makes u earn money not your degree) ……but i do support doctors they are a must need pillar of society and so is an engineer, but we need arts people as well because mona lisa painting da vinci concepts are equally important in a society.Recommend

  • Pappu

    All forms of Art are dependent on Scientific innovations.Recommend

  • Ali Baba

    @Pappu:
    All scientific inventions are dependent on Arts. Inventions were always presented & predicted first in the stories, novels, dramas & movies,etc.Recommend

  • Pappu

    @Ali Baba:

    …to publish stories, novels and to make dramas, movies you need science dude.Recommend

  • Zeb

    @Ali Baba:
    Inventions are/ were presented & predicted in “Theory” in a “Scientific Journal”Recommend

  • Pappu

    There is NO Nobel Prize for arts.Recommend

  • A.A Malik

    @Pappu: What about ECONOMICS?Recommend

  • Dr.N

    @ gp65

    It’s true that there are more colleges now,but there are more students as well-so it’s still highly competitive and for postgrad entrance exams(I gave mine in’05)-it’s difficult to get a good clinical masters without a reservation/quota…so some of us opt for usmle instead…students from the ’90s favoured plab.
    @Rabeea
    I just gave an opinion from what I’ve seen growing up-I felt that the career of choice has been different for each generation-for eg my greatgrandparents &gr.parents preffered being barristers/prof.s/authors/editors/principals/civil servants & expected their children (my parents/aunts/uncles) to be surgeons/chartered accountants/defence officers/engrs.Majority of my uncles&aunts became American& British physicians from the ’60s &’70s as per their parents wishes.In my generation,hardly any of us studied medicine-even the one’s who have parents who work as doctors..they can see how strenuous their parents professions are and have instead followed other careers widely varying from being painters in greenwich village/Indian news readers/CEOs/excavating Greek ruins/musicians/combat pilots/working for Google&Nasa/running NGO’s… all doing well( & feeling fulfilled)
    @ Nandita
    All eight of my great grandparents were keralites,so though I’ve never lived in the state,I’m 100% keralite.
    @Dr.Dang
    I noticed another reader/s also using ‘Indi’,recently,so reverted to my prefix and resubmitted my comment.
    I didn’t have time to read all the comments.Hope I didn’t miss out anyone else.
    Thanks for the feedback.Recommend

  • gp65

    @Pappu: “There is NO Nobel Prize for arts.”

    Huh? What a definitive way of making an utterly false statement. Have you heard of Nobel prize for literature?Recommend

  • Enjoy Life

    I work at an investment bank. One of the most demanding/high paying jobs on the market, working 80+ hours every week under high pressure where extreme importance is given to understanding, attention to detail, building financial models and most importantly come what may getting the job done and keeping the client happy.

    I dont think it really matters what you study about being smarter. I did science and then engineering in my bachelors and then development economics in my masters and now I work for an investment bank. I had average grades (a little above probably) all my life not studying too hard but making sure I enjoyed every moment. I probably could have scored better if I studied more but who cares you only live once. People in the bank come from multiple backgrounds such as engineers, liberal arts students, physicists, econ students etc.

    Grades/where and what you study might be a foot in the door but Ive seen people from the best universities in the world with amazing grades fail miserably. There is so much more to succeeding in life than what you studied, how high your grades were and where you studied.

    Most science students are unfortunately socially stunted focussing too much on formulas and their books. Being good with people is way more important than being able to crunch numbers or build something complex no matter what job your in. The sooner you learn that the further you will go in life (not that being technical is bad). So I would recommend people to work hard but enjoy life and go out to see the world and meet new people and learn to be social instead of living in your books and getting massive glasses in the process.Recommend

  • Dr.N

    @ gp65

    It’s true that there are more colleges now,but there are more students as well-so it’s still highly competitive and for postgrad entrance exams(I gave mine in’05)-it’s difficult to get a good clinical masters without a reservation/quota…so some of us opt for usmle instead…students from the ’90s favoured plab.
    @Rabeea
    I just gave an opinion from what I’ve seen growing up-I felt that the career of choice has been different for each generation-for eg my greatgrandparents &gr.parents preffered being barristers/prof.s/authors/editors/principals/civil servants & expected their children (my parents/aunts/uncles) to be surgeons/chartered accountants/defence officers/engrs.Majority of my uncles&aunts became American& British physicians from the ’60s &’70s as per their parents wishes.In my generation,hardly any of us studied medicine-even the one’s who have parents who work as doctors..they can see how strenuous their parents professions are and have instead followed other careers widely varying from being painters in greenwich village/news readers/CEOs/excavating Greek ruins/musicians/combat pilots/working for Google&NASA/running NGO’s… all doing well( & feeling fulfilled)
    @ Nandita
    All eight of my great grandparents were keralites,so though I’ve never lived in the state,I’m 100% keralite.
    @Dr.Dang
    I remembered seeing another reader/s also using the same nickname,recently,so reverted to my prefix and resubmitted my comment.
    I didn’t have time to read all the comments.Hope I didn’t miss out anyone else.
    Thanks for the feedback.Recommend

  • Nasir Mehmood

    Nice blog…this is a misconception…poor understanding that science students later get a fruitful life or are smarter or they have to become bookworm… I never found creativity in any science student like in an arts ..but they just stuff all books in their heads n do nothing else Recommend

  • Kappa

    @Nasir Mehmood:
    ” I never found creativity in any science student like in an arts ..but they just stuff all books in their heads n do nothing else”

    I am sure you are talking about south asian students.Recommend

  • gp65

    @Dr.N: The capacity of engineering and medicine schools has grown 20 fold in the last 20 years. The number of students has not grown anywhere near as much. While there is still strng competitions to get into IITs/IIMs/AIMs/IISC and other such high end institutes – pretty much anyone who can afford to pay fees can get into a medicine or engineering college these days (not referring to post grad here).

    Besides you are contradicting yourself. Earlier on, you said that rush to get into medicine and engineering was so 80s. But then you contradict yourself when you say in your response to me that the competition is as fierce as ever. Strange! Recommend

  • @ nasir Mehmood

    please dont generalize …Recommend

  • Dr.N

    @ gp65

    Not really contradicting myself…or you..I didn’t refer to an ’80s,’rush’- just parental expectations till the 80’s.I felt the people were more open to children taking up other careers (med & engrng) after that period.
    When I say,the competition is fierce (firstly why will college seats be vacant- parents adjusting their attitude & expectations doesn’t correspond to an epidemic of vacant mbbs seats)..now coming back to the fierce competition-another example-many of my classmates lost out Masters seats to just one or two marks difference and had to settle for Diplomas or go for foreign entrance exams…also a few marks can make you lose out on the top colleges,which everyone tries to get into…
    I’m not trying to argue here with anyone-just gave my opinion.Recommend

  • ptr

    It is like a comparison of apples and oranges!!!Recommend

  • Rida

    I really don’t get this mindset that a child securing A’s and A+ in academics or pure science subjects has the best of capabilities and brilliancy to opt for medicine/biology etc and would excel only in the respective field. After being fallen victim to such juvenile thought process was uplifted and compelled on the basis of distinctions to be a part of
    science alerts and become a doctor. Being a final year student and a part of such system of pre-medical and medical I have been analyzing every bit of it and deduced that it’s not the tag of science student which makes you brilliant but it’s the knowledge, attitude, practice and concept based learning which makes you conquer the respective subject. I come across students of media sciences, social sciences, textiles designing and related art fields and find them more optimistic,oriented and well-informed about their priorities and further engagements. I don’t categorize science students among those lagging behind but what we need to realize is that science has never been that superior neither arts has been
    inferior but they’re both collateral to what we call learning and should always be considered a branch of single umbrella labeling and guiding us towards success,excellency and brilliancy.Recommend

  • Saad

    Sensible stuff! Every student out there should read this. And in fact, the middle classes MUST realize the importance of both arts and science. I think a certain chunk of our people still prefer science over humanities which is ridiculous. Recommend

  • Nasir Mehmood

    @Kappa:
    Yes southasian ..specially .pakistan and india Recommend

  • Nasir Mehmood

    @@ nasir Mehmood ..you must be a science student lolsRecommend

  • Grammarian

    Short answer: Yes.Recommend

  • Naina

    No way…both are unique in their own ways.Recommend

  • pranabesh

    No war mongering and I liked it.keep it up healthy debate increase knowledgeRecommend

  • GM Gi2

    Nice article .but this culture is no more i think so .i m doing engineering only coz o my own interest ,and we engineering are even more smarter then doctor .:PRecommend

  • Ms. Right

    OMG! The following news is alarming…

    http://tribune.com.pk/story/603914/alarming-statistics-25-colleges-fail-to-produce-any-science-students-this-year/

    A big laugh for those who still think of science students as the smarter onesRecommend

  • AZ

    Some people in the comments are such idiots its actually nauseous.
    Listen different jobs/fields have different requirements. Take a typical engineer, he needs to have basic knowledge of physics, chemistry etc to create a machine.
    Now go to the Arts side, this guy need to have people skills and creativity so that he can sell the engineer’s machine. THEY BOTH NEED EACH OTHER
    Its also called being efficient, just creating a machine is not enough. What usedoes that machine have to society, how to get the most out of it, this is where humanities people are needed.
    Think about it, who makes TV ads? Graphic designers, who need skill to create that stuff.
    If being an artist is THAT easy why don’t you engineers draw an exact still life right now? Can you? There is literally a marketing department and HR department in every multinational because they realise the importance of clients and understanding their needs. A psychologist would be helpful there right?
    Both sides are important to the development of society. One just runs in the backstage instead of the spotlight, that doesn’t mean the backstage is not importantRecommend

  • GM GI2
  • Sane

    @Pappu:

    There is NO Nobel Prize for arts.

    Correct your knowledge. What is literature then?!!Recommend

  • Sonam

    The sooner we realize that all fields of education are worth studying, the better. Logical aspects highlighted. Keep it up!Recommend

  • Einstein

    The fact remains….the brilliant go for science…the left overs do arts..Recommend

  • Pappu

    @gp65:
    @Sane:

    “While literature has a valuable place in our society as an outlet and source of new ideas and entertainment, it can not be considered art. Its adherence to a strict set of rules that govern the how a written work must be assembled, as well as a lack of specific qualities that distinguish artistic pieces from all others, maintain this assertion. I apologize to any writers who may be offended, but at least you can consider yourselves craftswomen and craftsmen”

    Jake D Skinner
    Recommend